Category: New to Nashville


What Are the Best Companies to Work for in Nashville?

If you’re a regular follower of this blog, you’ll notice my absence for the past several weeks. I was out of town due to a death in the family, but I’m back in Nashville and available to assist you with your career coaching needs.

As I was driving back into town, I was reminded of the vibrancy of this city. The amount of growth Nashville has experienced in the 15 years I’ve been here has been amazing. So many companies have moved to the area, creating more job opportunities than ever before.

Yesterday, the Nashville Business Journal announced it’s annual list of the best places to work in Nashville. I’m sharing this list with you below so you can know where to target your next job search in Music City, with the help of paNASH of course!

35 best places to work in Nashville

The following companies are listed as this year’s best places to work in Nashville based on three factors:

  • Employee satisfaction
  • High retention rates
  • A healthy bottom line

1. ARCO Murray Nashville

2. Blueprint Inc.

3. Evolution Event Solutions

4. Hire Dynamics

5. Judith Bright Jewelry

6. Nashville Vascular & Vein Institute

7. Rock House Center

8. Row House Cool Springs

9. Tennessee Bar Association

10. TennGreen Land Conservancy

11. Davidson County Register of Deeds

12. Graduate Nashville

13. Jones Lang LaSalle

14. Patterson, Hardee, & Ballentine CPAs

15. Rocky McElhaney Law Firm

16. Rustici Software

17. ServisFirst Bank

18. Studio Bank

19. The Onin Group

20. Trinisys

21. Brasfield & Gorrie

22. Churchill Mortgage

23. DPR Construction

24. First Community Mortgage

25. Healthcare Bluebook

26. InfoWorks

27. JE Dunn Construction

28. KraftCPAs PLLC

29. Turner Construction Co.

30. Vaco

31. Deloitte

32. Gresham Smith

33. RJ Young

34. Waller Lansden Dortch & Davis LLC

35. Wesley Financial Group LLC

Job search assistance available

For assistance with your job search for an opportunity with any of the companies above, click here to complete the paNASH intake form.

paNASH Announces Free Career Coaching Resources for Tornado Victims Left Jobless

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (March 10th, 2020) – Career coach and owner of paNASH Career Coaching Lori Bumgarner announced her company is offering free career coaching resources for tornado victims left jobless.

These resources are designed to help those who are looking for temporary or permanent employment due to the destruction of several businesses during March 3rd’s tornado in Davidson, Wilson, and Putnam counties.

“I am saddened by the loss of life, property, and livelihood here in Nashville and surrounding counties,” Bumgarner said. “Clean-up is occurring rapidly due to the Tennessee volunteer spirit, but it will take a long time to rebuild. Now that some of the most immediate needs of victims are being met, paNASH is here to help with the process of finding new employment for those who are jobless due to the devastation.”

According to Metro Codes, there were nearly 200 commercial buildings damaged or destroyed by the tornado, resulting in both permanently and temporarily displaced employees.*

“Whether you’re seeking temporary or permanent employment, you need the skills to find something as quickly as possible,” Bumgarner continues. “The job search skills paNASH teaches are designed to help decrease the amount of time to find work and increase the quality of the candidate’s approach resulting in more consideration for advanced opportunities.”

paNASH provides several online career coaching resources available immediately to anyone who has an Internet connection.

Users from any of the affected counties can work online (either from home or a local library) at their own pace to learn how to significantly improve their resume, interview skills, and networking efforts. While typically there is a fee for these resources, paNASH is waiving the fee for those who currently find themselves jobless due to the tornado.

Bumgarner will also offer additional free career coaching services such as resume critiques and one-on-one coaching for a select number of people affected by the storm.

For more information, email Bumgarner at LoriB@yourpassioninlife.com with the subject line “tornado job loss.” Bumgarner will respond with details on what they need to do and the documentation they need to provide to get started.

* Source: https://fox17.com/news/local/nashville-devastation-395-homes-184-businesses-majorly-damaged-or-destroyed-in-tornado

About paNASH:

Based in Nashville, TN, paNASH provides career coaching services and job search preparation for those seeking a career change.

paNASH’s mission is to serve, educate and encourage others by assisting them with the discovery and pursuit of their passions in a way that honors their purpose and their own vision for success while amplifying who they are personally and advancing them professionally.

paNASH is owned by Lori Bumgarner, a certified coach with over 20 years of experience as a career adviser. She is a bestselling author and has been featured in The Wall Street Journal, The Huffington Post, and Inc.com. Bumgarner has been ranked by Expertise.com as one of the top ten coaches in Nashville for three consecutive years.

For press inquiries, please contact:

Lori Bumgarner

paNASH

615.375.6742

LoriB@yourpassioninlife.com

Free Career Coaching Resources for Tornado Victims Left Jobless

Early Tuesday morning March 3rd, thousands of people in the Nashville and Middle Tennessee areas found themselves without a home when an EF3 tornado ripped through their neighborhoods. Others suddenly found themselves unemployed due to the destruction of several businesses, schools, and industrial areas. And some found themselves both homeless and jobless in a matter of seconds.

paNASH Career Coaching is saddened by the loss of life, property, and livelihood here in Nashville and surrounding counties. It will take a long time to rebuild, but once the most immediate needs of victims are met, paNASH will be there to help with the process of finding new employment for those who are now jobless due to the devastation.

paNASH is currently making arrangements to provide free career coaching resources in the coming days and weeks. Please stay tuned for details by subscribing to the paNASH newsletter and the blog post alerts in the right hand column.

***Click here for updated details.***

How To Stop Comparing Yourself to Others

It’s time to stop comparing yourself to others! Comparing yourself can be destructive to your self-esteem, detrimental in the pursuit of your purpose, and downright depressing!

Yet, you probably find yourself playing the comparison game quite often. Does it tend to happen most when scrolling through Facebook or Instagram? Yeah, that’s what I suspected.

We all know logically that (most) people only post their best moments in life on social media, and edit out their worst moments. But emotionally it’s hard for us to remember this. As a result, we end up comparing our worst to someone else’s best, while forgetting others also have a worst.

If you don’t learn how to stop comparing yourself to others, you will never reach your own potential.

So how can you stop? Let’s look at the following case study to find out.

Stop Comparing Yourself (A Case Study)

Artists of any medium (performing artists like dancers, actors, singers and songwriters and visual artists like painters, sculptors, and photographers) tend to be much harder on themselves and compare themselves more to others than non-artists do.

Jessica* was no exception. I met Jessica when I was giving a presentation on the topic of personal branding at the Nashville Arts & Business Council. She was a songwriter attending the event along side various other artists, including everyone from graffiti artists to jewelry makers.

After I led the group through the three phases of my personal branding program, Jessica broke down in tears. She quickly let the group know her tears were happy tears.

She explained how she’d been comparing herself to all the other songwriters in Nashville since she moved to town to pursue her passion for music. And now, this program helped her see she doesn’t have to compare herself to her competition. She said it taught her how to better pinpoint her own uniqueness.

Jessica felt relief and was freed from the damage she’d been doing to her self-esteem with unnecessary comparison.

How you can stop comparing yourself to others

While artists might compare themselves more to their peers than you do, I’m sure you find yourself doing so more often than you’d like. So what are some things you can do to stop?

One, when you get the urge to pick up your phone and start scrolling and comparing, instead put your phone down and go find something to do that will make you forget to check your phone.

This could be something you enjoy so much you easily lose yourself in it. Like, reading a new book, taking a walk, writing in your journal, making something with your hands, trying a new hobby, etc.

stop comparing yourself

Two, realize everyone has a unique way of doing the same things others do. When you do those things in your own unique way, no one else can do them like you can. It’s like having your own thumbprint on your process.

Three, discover the things you’re good at and how you do them uniquely. If you need help discovering what you’re good at, I encourage you to check out my personal branding program for yourself. You can go through it in one of three ways:

  1. Purchase the paperback book on Amazon.
  2. Get the book for free with purchase of the on-demand video course.
  3. Get personalized one-on-coaching to help you with your specific needs and questions on discovering your unique skills and developing your personal brand.

Restore your self-esteem by being productive in the pursuit of your passion and purpose instead of wasting your time comparing yourself to others!

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*Name has been changed for privacy.

stop comparing yourself

How to Be More Successful By Living In the Moment

I was all harnessed up and clipped in to the cables at the new Adventure Park Nashville when it was time to step out onto my first tree-to-tree bridge element.

I paused for a second and thought, there’s no way I can do this. It seemed not only uncomfortable, but also scary.

In the past I’ve had no fear learning how to climb at various climbing gyms. I’ve never minded the heights and always loved getting to the top for the sense of accomplishment and so I could repel down (my favorite part!).

But this was different.

Instead of looking at the holds right in front of me or looking up to where I was going, I had to look DOWN to see where and how to get my footing. This made me realize how far off the ground I was. Also, when climbing walls or rocks, they don’t sway and move like the bridge elements do.

This was a whole new experience for me.

Trying Melts Away Fear

I was tempted to turn back before I’d even started. But, I knew I would not be happy with myself if I did.

I had to at least give it a try.

Besides I’m always preaching to my clients about doing things that take them out of their comfort zone, and I also live my life that way as much as possible. This was another reason why I couldn’t turn back.

After taking the first step, my fear melted away and I completely forgot about the distance between the ground and me.

I just took my time and put one foot in front of the other.

When I reached the end of the first bridge element, I became a little more confident. I did it!

Living in the Moment

Even though there were several elements ahead of me, I had to take each of them one at a time, asking myself what’s the best way to get across without losing my balance.

My confidence grew and grew after successfully completing each element.

While working my way across one bridge, I couldn’t think about the next bridge. I had to stay focused on the moment. This was an unexpected lesson, and also the biggest take away from the experience.

I never went into it thinking I’d learn more focus. I just thought it’d be fun to do something new and to be outside in nature.

But it was a lesson I really needed because I’m the type of person who’s always thinking ahead and planning ahead.

For instance, I eat dinner with the question bouncing around in my head, “What do I want to make for dinner tomorrow night?” instead of just enjoying the meal right in front of me.

I need to practice living in the moment more often.

Not only for my own benefit, but also because I want to serve as a positive example for my clients.

Avoid Thinking Too Far Ahead to the “What ifs?”

So many of my clients are facing career changes and life transitions.

They know they have some bridges to cross, whether it means moving from one career to another, moving from working for someone else to working for themselves, etc.

For them moving from one stage to the next can seem scary and nearly impossible at first.

The path to get from one stage to the next can appear very unstable. It may not be clear to them how they should proceed or what step they should take first.

They often start thinking ahead to the “What ifs?”

Instead of focusing on what’s within their control at this very moment, they’re asking:

  • “What if I don’t fit in with the people at a new company?”
  • “What if I’m not as successful in a new industry?”
  • “If my business idea fails what will I do?”

Gaining Stability in Your Career Transitions

What I quickly realized with each bridge element was what appeared to be “unstable” was actually very stable, especially when I did my part to make things more stable.

I wasn’t going to be able to keep the elements from swaying and moving. But, if I:

  • slowed down and focused on one element at a time,
  • kept a light grip on the cable so my hands could easily slide as I moved,
  • put one foot in front of the other while positioning my feet in a way that kept me balanced,
  • and shifted my body weight so it was working with the movement of the elements instead of against them,

I was able to get across a lot easier.

And if I happened to slip or lose my balance, my harness would keep me from falling.

It would’ve been a small failure, but it wouldn’t have been the end of the world.

How to Get to the Other Side Successfully

If you’re facing a career transition and it seems scary trying to cross over to what’s next for you, remember these four things:

1. Learn to live in the moment.

Embrace your current situation no matter how scary, uncomfortable or unstable it may appear.

Relish this time to re-evaluate your approach to things, to try different strategies, or to learn something new.

Don’t rush through this stage to the next one just because it’s uncomfortable. Doing so could cause some slip-ups that will likely slow you down instead.

Just stay focused on the present as you put one foot in front of the other.

2. Keep a light grip.

Instead of keeping a tight grip on your idea of how you think things should be or should work out, loosen your grip.

You’d be surprised at how much easier you’ll be able to navigate through your situation when you allow some flexibility in your results.

And you’ll be open to opportunities you otherwise would’ve quickly dismissed.

3. Be willing to make a shift when necessary.

If you’re stuck, be honest with yourself and admit you’re stuck.

Then, take steps to shift your approach so you can become unstuck.

This may mean asking for help or hiring a career coach to point out any blind spots or to show you a more effective way of getting across your bridge. A career coach can also teach you how to work with your unique challenges instead of against them.

4. Rely on your support system.

These are the people who aren’t going to let you fall even if you slip up or lose your balance. This can include your family, friends, professional network, career coach, etc.

If you need help with any of the above, feel free to reach out by completing the paNASH intake form. Click here to get started.

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Click here for tickets and more info on the Nashville Adventure Park. It really is a lot of fun!