Category: Goal-setting


How to Go From Burned Out to Fired Up!

I have so many clients who come to me feeling burned out in their current job. For some of them it’s not from working too much. Instead it’s from working outside their gifting. For others, they love their job and company, but their employers treat them as machines instead of humans!

Burned out from working too much

For those of you who are in a company or job you enjoy but are feeling burned out from overwork, looking for a new job and sending out resumes is probably not the answer right now.

Doing so would be the same as uprooting your family and moving to a house right next door to a restaurant just because you happen to be hungry right now.

Trust me. You don’t want to trade a burnout with a company you love for a burnout with a company you’ll hate.

Have the tough conversation with your boss

Instead, I suggest having a frank conversation with your supervisor, no matter how difficult or scary it may feel.

Former Wall Street CEO (for both Smith Barney and Merrill Lynch) and now entrepreneur Sallie Krawcheck says,

“The days of the boss as ‘hard-ass’ need to be kissed good-bye. Today the business world increasingly values the kind of leaders who recognize that their employees’ lives don’t begin and end when they are at work. Many of us have families, and pets, and outside interests, and medical needs, and hobbies. Really, it’s well past time to get over requiring face time. And work as an extreme sport, complete with all-nighters and last-minute business trips-it isn’t good for employees, and it certainly doesn’t allow anyone to do their best work; and younger professionals are turning away from it in droves. Why not own the fact that we are all people and acknowledge that all of us need time for our outside lives? It’s just smart business.”

Instead of taking the angle of needing some much needed relief from your current workload, take the angle of how you want to be the best and most productive employee you can be for your boss.

Tell him or her how your current workload is negatively impacting your ability to do your best. Then focus on how you can improve your performance and productivity with just a few suggested tweaks.

Propose a win-win-win situation

Think ahead what tweaks you can suggest to be a win-win-win. (A win for your boss that will make him or her look good, a win for the company’s bottom line, and a win for you and your sanity.)

Some examples of tweaks you can suggest may include:

  • Delegating some things to your subordinates.
  • Working remotely from home one to two days a week.
  • Trading travel to in-person site visits for Skype meetings.

A trial period

Give your boss the option to try what you’re suggesting on a trial basis (typically two weeks). Offer to go back to the old way if it doesn’t work.

During those two weeks, track every single positive impact on the company’s bottom line you notice.

Examples of positive outcomes include:

  • Reduction in errors.
  • Financial savings for the company.
  • More satisfied clients/customers.
  • Increase in more qualified prospects.
  • Increase in repeat sales from current customers.
  • Time used more wisely.

Deliver results

Create a report reflecting these positive outcomes and present it to your boss at the end of the two weeks.

Then once you share your positive results, ask your boss for two additional weeks to see if you can repeat what you’ve accomplished in the first two weeks. If you can, he or she will find it hard to justify saying no to an indefinite continuation of your new approach to your workload.

Consider your next move

Only after you’ve had this conversation with your boss should you consider looking for a new job.

If your supervisor likes your work as much as you like working for him or her, you shouldn’t feel paranoid about broaching the subject. In fact, your boss will probably be glad you brought your struggle to his or her attention.

But if your proposal is immediately shot down and it’s obvious your feedback is not appreciated, then you’ll know it’s probably time to look for something new. But I strongly recommend taking some vacation time (even if you don’t go out of town) to really think about if you should leave your job. And if so, for what other kind of job?

Use this time to also figure out your personal mission and purpose in life so you’ll know what opportunities to say yes to and which ones to say no to. Make sure you’re targeting opportunities that allow you to work in your gifting. Otherwise, you’ll end up burned out all over again.

Don’t get burned out on burnout

When looking for something new, do so with a clear mind. Again, use some of your vacation time to take a step back and get some proper perspective on what exactly you want in your next job and what will be a good fit for your personal mission. It will be worth it!

If you need help determining your purpose and gifting, start with paNASH’s on-demand video course on personal branding. Do this before you update your resume and just start sending it out randomly with no real focus.

Don’t get burned out on burnout. If you follow the suggestions above, you can find a new lease on life which can really get you fired up about your career!

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Nobody Likes a Know-It-All. Be a Learn-It-All Instead!

How to Enrich Your Life and Career with Lifelong Learning

I’m currently learning how to land paddle. Last week one of my stand up paddle boarding friends gave me another lesson in it. Land paddling is similar to stand up paddle boarding on water, but it feels so different! It’s like being on a big skate board with a stick that has a stopper instead of a paddle at the end of it.

To me it feels very foreign compared to being on water. (Confession: I’m much more clumsy on dry land than I am on water!) I’ve never skate boarded before, so this is way outside my comfort zone! But it’s a great way to get outside and get exercise, especially after paddle boarding season ends.

learninglearning

I’m also currently teaching myself about financial investing. This is something I once had no interest in because I didn’t think I had the ability to fully comprehend it. Even though it’s never too late to learn about investing, my limiting belief kept me in my comfort zone longer than it should have. This probably cost me money in hidden fees and the additional money I could’ve already earned had I understood it better.

Luckily my father is well-versed in this area and got me started early on with a financial adviser. But now I’m becoming more educated on how it all works. And I’m starting to make my own investment decisions instead of just relying on my financial adviser.

Finally, I’ve hired a digital marketing expert to teach me how to improve my business marketing and increase the sales of my on-demand video courses. Much of what she’s teaching me are things I know I need to do, but I’m learning from her how to prioritize it all. It’s not always easy to find the time to implement her suggestions while balancing my client base, but I know it’s important to do so I can scale my business.

Importance of Being a Learn-It-All

I’m doing all of the things above because I understand how important lifelong learning is. Being a “learn-it-all” is imperative for growth, success, and fulfillment. In fact, lifelong learning is so important I’ve included “education” as one of the seven goal categories in my 8-Step Goal-Achievement Plan (free when you subscribe to my weekly newsletter).

Continual learning can increase your earnings, reduce your risk of age-related diseases, and enrich your life!

Learning Doesn’t Follow the Smooth Road

You can see from my own experiences listed above there are oftentimes obstacles involved in being a “learn-it-all”. These obstacles can include discomfort, limiting beliefs, and time constraints. But those obstacles should never be used as excuses for not being open to learning new things.

These negative feelings and risks are to be expected. Author and CEO Gary Burnison says,

“People who are curious and risk-takers are often the best learners. But learning doesn’t follow the smooth road.”

And learning opportunities are not limited to the risk-takers. Even if you’re not a natural risk-taker, you can learn how to become a better learner.

How to Become a Good “Learn-It-All”

Burnison also goes on to say,

“While learning agility, to a large degree, is inborn…it can be developed. One of the was you can become more learning agile is to develop your curiosity. People who are curious are engaged in the world. There interests are varied, and they are constantly learning. They intentionally expose themselves to the new and different, whether that means eating unfamiliar foods or listening to music that’s outside their favorite genre. They approach every day as a new opportunity to learn something, especially about themselves. That’s why the best…CEOs begin and end the day with self-reflection.”

You can be a good “learn-it-all” by increasing your curiosity in some of the simple ways Burnison listed above.

For instance, next time you go out to eat, order something on the menu you can’t pronounce or have never heard of. And don’t just take a picture of it for your Instagram! Actually taste it and savor it. I shudder when I think of all the great foods I would’ve missed out on (including camel!) had I not been curious enough to try them.

Burnison says you can also be a good learner by ending your day or week with self-reflection. Self-reflection is the very first exercise in my book and on-demand video course Personal Branding: Why You Need to Know What Makes You YOUnique and AWEthentic.

Tangible Examples

It’s this same branding program that’s helped so many paNASH clients open their minds to learning something new and enriching their careers. It’s even led several clients to some really cool side hustles and career changes.

For instance, my client Ashley discovered she has both a passion and a talent for voice-over work. Had she not taken a voice-over basics course at the local community ed program I told her about, she never would’ve discovered her new-found talent.

She’s since taken a more intensive voice-over course while also building her voice-over portfolio. She’s even landed some voice-over gigs with her current corporation she works for. Her short-term plan is to get an agent so she can get more gigs. Her long-term plan is to eventually turn it from a side hustle into a full-time thing.

Another client, Adelaide, decided to leave her job without knowing what she wanted to do next. But because she’s a saver she was financially able to do so.

Shortly after leaving her job and in the midst of our work together, she discovered the Nashville Software School. She did some research on it and decided to delve into the world of coding which is something completely different from what she went to college for or what she’d been doing in the past. Because of her savings and her creative budget management, she was able to afford the six-month program.

A week before graduation she landed a job with a highly sought-after company. This company’s interview process usually takes several months, but she had one interview and got hired a week later.

What are you learning?

So my questions to you are:

  • What do you want to learn?
  • What are you curious about?
  • Are you currently learning something new?
  • Are you making time to expand your mind on something interesting?

Education doesn’t end after graduation. So become a “learn-it-all”!

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Is Your Comfort Zone Really All That Comfortable?

Do you think your comfort zone is really all that comfortable?

Well, let’s see. Does any of this describe your current situation?

If any of the above sounds familiar, your comfort zone is anything but comfortable.

The Line Between Your Comfort Zone and the Life You Really Desire

Instead, it’s what I call the THRIVE ZONE.

comfort zone

Are You Willing to Step Out of Your Comfort Zone?

Are you fed up enough with how uncomfortable your comfort zone is you’re willing to experience some temporary discomfort and make some changes?

Next Steps to Your Thrive Zone

First, learn how to set (and achieve) goals the right way. This involves subscribing to the paNASH newsletter to receive an 8-Step Goal-Achievement Plan. This complimentary resource will help you:

Second, if you like free resources and want more, register for my complimentary on-demand program 5 Ways to Pursue Your Passions in Life and Work. In this program you’ll learn how to:

The Results You Can Expect

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How to Make Your Big Decisions More Simple

Excerpt From Lori’s Latest Personal Branding Book

Here’s an edited excerpt from my newest personal branding book. I’m excited to share in my third book how to make better life and career decisions. Enjoy!

Are you facing a big decision, unsure which direction to take or which option to choose?

It could be career-related, such as the choice between two job offers.

Or it could be more personal, like the choice between staying in a relationship or ending it.

If only there was a simple way to make these difficult decisions! Well, maybe there is.

Notice I said “simple,” not “easy.”


I’ve personally found a simple way to make some of my hardest decisions.

But, it requires deep reflection and discipline to utilize it.

I’ve used this same method in working with my clients to help them better face their own difficult decisions.

Here’s how it’s worked for me, and how it can work for you.


Reflection

First, I had to come up with my own personal mission statement.

I’d done a professional mission statement for my business, so why not a personal one just for me?

I had to spend time reflecting on my core values, philosophy, and goals.

Then I had to reflect on how I wanted to carry out those hopes and beliefs.

This took some time and required me to be completely honest with myself and with God.

My personal mission statement:

“To boldly pursue my passions and purpose, and to teach, encourage, and inspire others to do the same, resulting in lives overflowing with joy, peace, and fulfillment.”


Discipline

Second, I had to remember to use my mission statement as a filter for all my choices.

If the choice didn’t support my mission statement, it had to go.

I had to be disciplined enough to make the decision my mission statement revealed to be the right one.

No matter how difficult it would be.


For example, at the time I wrote my mission statement in late 2015, my friendship with my guy-friend was turning romantic.

The relationship was great at first, but after nine months of dating, I noticed a pattern that had been developing for some time.

This pattern wouldn’t make such a relationship sustainable if certain variables remained the same, which they did.

I wasn’t sure if I should end the relationship or give it another chance.

After much prayer, I was reminded of my mission statement and why I’d written it.

So, I pulled it out and started reading it. I immediately realized that the relationship didn’t support the life goals in my mission statement.


What I had to do.

Though I didn’t want to end the relationship, I had to in order to stay true and authentic to my God-given hopes.

It wasn’t an easy thing to do because my heart didn’t feel like ending it.

But my soul knew what was best for me in the long run. (This is why it’s dangerous to subscribe to the “just-follow-your-heart” advice of today’s culture.)

I had to be disciplined enough to push through my fickle emotions which were temporary, and focus on the decision that would make me happier and healthier down the road.

Once I ended it, I received confirmation in so many forms (including red flags that weren’t previously present) and realized I had indeed made the right decision.

Anytime I considered turning back, those red flags served as reminders as to why I had to stick to my decision.


What do you have to do?

Do you have a big decision in your life you soon have to make?

Maybe it involves a move to a new state or a new country.

Maybe it involves going back to school or ending a long-time friendship.

Whatever decision you face, I encourage you to follow a similar process to see if it helps make things a little simpler.

Not easier, just simpler.

It may even make you stronger.

Get the Personal Branding Book!

To learn how to write your own mission statement along with discovering what makes you unique and how to articulate your uniqueness, check out my latest book:

Personal Branding: Why You Need to Know What Makes You YOUnique and AWEthentic

Copies of my personal branding book are available in paperback for $12.99 or for free with purchase of my on-demand program. To receive more info, click below:

personal branding book

Sunday Inspiration: Recognize Your Gift, Know Your Goal

Welcome to “Sunday Inspiration,” a bi-weekly devotional for those seeking spiritual encouragement in the pursuit of their passions. Each post comes from an outside resource (as referenced). I hope these posts will inspire and motivate you in your life and career in addition to our weekly original blog posts. Enjoy!

“Do not turn aside; for then you would go after empty things which cannot profit.” 1Sa 12:21 NKJV

In order to succeed in what God has called you to do in life, you must recognize your gift and know your goal.

When you’re clear about and committed to these two things, you need to demonstrate two qualities: discipline and determination.

Fritz Kreisler, one of the greatest violinists of all time, had them. Crowds packed Carnegie Hall in New York to hear him. But the road to success was a bumpy ride.

As a boy he wanted to do nothing more than play the violin, so his parents paid for him to have music lessons. But he didn’t make as much progress as they hoped, and after a few years he quit the lessons.

Over the next several years, through college and early adulthood, he studied medicine but failed to complete medical school.

He joined the army and failed to be promoted.

He tried and quit many other pursuits.

Realizing that the one piece of success he had enjoyed in life related to the violin, he went back to his instructor and said, “I want to play.”

She said, “Fine, I’ll take you back as a student, but only if you acquire the irreplaceable quality that is necessary for you to become a great violinist. You must exhibit undefeatable determination.”

So once again, here are your steps to success: (1) Recognize your gift. (2) Know your goal. (3) Dedicate yourself to the process no matter how long it takes. (4) Trust God to bless your efforts.

Source: https://jentezenfranklin.org/daily-devotions/recognize-your-gift-know-your-goal