Tag: success


Sunday Inspiration: Overcoming Failure

Welcome to “Sunday Inspiration,” a bi-weekly devotional for those seeking spiritual encouragement in the pursuit of their passions. Each post comes from an outside resource (as referenced). I hope these posts will inspire and motivate you in your life and career in addition to our weekly original blog posts. Enjoy!

“My flesh…may fail, but God is the strength of my heart.” Ps 73:26 NIV

As you drive toward your destiny, you’re sure to hit potholes along the way, or take some wrong turns, or forget to check your gas gauge and run out of fuel. The truth is, the only way to avoid failure is to not leave your driveway!

In the words of author William Saroyan:

“Good people are good because they’ve come to wisdom through failure.”

The real issue in life isn’t whether or not you’re going to fail, but whether you’re going to learn from your experience and turn it into the wisdom needed to succeed.

In a survey of successful people, not one of them viewed their mistakes as failures. They considered them “learning experiences,” or “tuition paid,” or “opportunities for growth.” That’s the winning attitude!

Henry Ward Beecher said:

“It’s defeat that turns bone to flint…gristle into muscle…and makes men invincible. Do not then be afraid of defeat. You are never so near victory as when you’re defeated in a good cause.”

So the next time you fail at something, stop and ask yourself:

  • What have I learned?
  • Am I grateful for this experience?
  • How can I turn it into success?
  • Where do I go from here?
  • Who else has failed like this, and how can they help me?
  • How can my experience help others?
  • Did I actually fail, or just fall short of an unrealistically high goal?
  • Where did I succeed as well as fail?

Then go one step further, and ask God for greater insight. If you do, you’ll grow stronger and wiser because of what you’ve been through (See James 1:5).

Source: https://www.jentezenfranklin.org/daily-devotions/overcoming-failure

Sunday Inspiration: Seeing Your True Self

Welcome to “Sunday Inspiration,” a bi-weekly devotional for those seeking spiritual encouragement in the pursuit of their passions. Each post comes from an outside resource (as referenced). I hope these posts will inspire and motivate you in your life and career in addition to our weekly original blog posts. Enjoy!

“We…saw giants…we felt like grasshoppers.” Nu 13:33 NLT

Ten of Israel’s twelve spies returned from the Promised Land saying, “We…saw giants …we felt like grasshoppers.”

The other two, Joshua and Caleb, saw the same giants but believed that with God’s help they could be conquered: “Let us go up at once and possess it…for we are well able” (v. 30 TLB).

That’s the language of a winner!

Understand this: God has a plan for your life, but you’ll never fulfill it until you come into agreement with His Word.

“But I have so many problems. How could God use someone like me?” you ask.

Paul said, “I don’t mean to say that I have already…reached perfection. But I press on to possess that perfection for which Christ Jesus first possessed me” (Php 3:12 NLT).

When God uses imperfect people, it makes us realize that He alone is our source, our strength, our strategy, and the secret to our success.

The Bible says, “The foolish thing [that has its source in] God is wiser than men, and the weak thing [that springs] from God is stronger than men” (1Co 1:25 AMPC).

You have a God-ordained destiny, and no excuse for not fulfilling it.

You can’t use weakness as a defense, for God says, “My strength is made perfect in weakness” (2Co 12:9).

You can’t use your past as an excuse, for God says, “Old things are passed away…all things are become new” (2Co 5:17).

How God sees you isn’t the problem; it’s how you see yourself that keeps you from succeeding!

So ask God to give you a new understanding of how He sees you—loved, righteous, blessed, and favored!

Source: https://www.jentezenfranklin.org/daily-devotions/seeing-yourself-as-god-sees-you

How to Avoid Stereotypes That Hurt Your Child’s Career

Millennials and Gen Z’ers sometimes get a bad rap for not having the ability to appropriately handle unpleasant obstacles.

But there’s one millennial who is defying all the stereotypes. Her name is Kristen Hadeed. She’s the owner of a successful business she started while in college which now employees over 600 people. She’s also the author of the book Permission to Screw Up: How I Learned to Lead by Doing (Almost) Everything Wrong.

Failing Successfully

I recently got to hear Kristen speak about how her business’s success was built on failure. In her talk, she credits her parents for her ability to fail successfully.

What she means by this is she was raised in a home where her parents believed tough love is sometimes necessary for success.

One particular example she shared is when in high school she went to her father for help with her calculus homework. He said,

“I can’t help you. Do you know why? I can’t be there when you’re taking your test. If you can’t answer the question now, how are you going to be able to answer it during the test? You need to figure out where you’re stuck and go ask your teacher about it.”

She said she hated him for it, but still felt loved by him. She followed his advice and ended up with the highest grade in her calculus class.

It was this tough love lesson that taught Kristen how to solve her own problems and grow as a person and businesswoman.

As a result, she uses this same tough love approach to successfully lead her employees who 90% are college students. This approach instills confidence in her employees even when they screw up royally, and give them ownership over their successes.

Do you fit the “lawnmower parent” stereotypes?

Not only does Kristen defy the stereotypes of millennials. Her parents defy the stereotypes of parents of millennials.

Instead of being “lawnmower parents” who mow down every obstacle their child might face, they allowed her opportunities to learn how to deal with obstacles and failure.

They didn’t “over-help” her, as she says.

But she sees the negative effects of over-helpful parenting in many of the college students who work for her.

She sees their lack of confidence and lack of belief in their own skills.

My colleagues and I see it too in the younger generations we work with. And this is often the cause of their bad rap.

My colleagues and I see firsthand how so many “lawnmower parents” are plowing their way through their child’s career.

Specifically, I experience parents of people as old as 30 calling me wanting to sign their son or daughter up for my career coaching services because their “child” isn’t happy in their current job. (Sometimes they call me without their son or daughter knowing it!)

A colleague of mine who’s on the other side of the table in HR and recruiting experiences it too. She witnesses parents who try to involve themselves in their “child’s” interview process or negotiate salary for their “children.”

(I use quotes around “child” and “children” because these are actually adults I’m referring to.)

My tough love for you

I’m all for helping people who aren’t happy in their current job find something better. That’s what I do!

BUT, I won’t take on a client who cannot take the initiative to contact me directly.

And my colleague says she will never hire a candidate whose parents get involved in the interview process.

So if this is something you as a parent are doing, stop it now before you further hurt your adult child’s chances of landing a job.

If you’re the “child” whose parents are doing this, don’t allow it! Your career is at stake!

This is my tough love to those who are or have lawnmower parents!

It’s not my business who’s paying for it

Now some parents will say to me, “Well I’m calling for my son because I’m the one who’ll be paying for your services!”

It’s not my business who’s paying for it. But it is my business who I’ll be working with. And I need to talk to them. Not their parents.

I have a client who’s still a college student. I can’t say for sure if she got the money for the career coaching services from her parents or not because her parents stayed out of the situation. She took the initiative to reach out to me on her own. She knew her goals and knew what she wanted to accomplish with the coaching.

This is why she’s now my client. These are the type of clients I want to work with. It has nothing to do with their age and everything to do with their initiative.

If a client can’t take the initiative to contact me directly and complete my simple intake form on their own, they’ll never be able to do the homework required in my coaching program.

There have been a couple of cases where I have taken a client whose parents called me, only because I knew the parents personally. And even then I regretted it.

Their children were the clients who either had a bad attitude throughout the coaching process, or they didn’t use all the sessions their parents had paid for. To me this is a waste of their parents’ money, and I never want anyone to feel like they’ve wasted their money with me.

Another way “lawnmower parenting” can hurt your child’s career

I have a millennial client right now who’s great! Her father has stayed out of her career coaching process.

However, she tells me he occasionally involves himself in her networking efforts without her permission.

And he does so in the wrong ways. He does all the things I teach her NOT to do, therefore undoing much of what she and I have already worked on.

How to help your son or daughter the right way

I understand parents want to help their children make connections that can lead to good jobs. And job seekers should begin their networking efforts with who they know, including their parents.

But, if you’re a parent wanting to help in this way, I suggest first brushing up on your own networking skills with my on-demand networking course and reading my free blog posts on networking etiquette.

Don’t assume you already know everything about networking. Especially if it’s been a while since the last time you’ve had to look for a job. Even my adult clients who happen to have millennial children first come to me not knowing how to network in today’s job market.

Next, I suggest not to put pressure on your contacts when making introductions. Never make them feel obligated to talk to your son or daughter. No one likes to be on the receiving end of being put on the spot.

Instead, ask if they’re willing and if their schedule allows to talk with your son or daughter.

If they say no, thank them and maybe ask if they know of anyone else they feel comfortable recommending to talk to your son or daughter.

If they say yes, give your son or daughter their contact info and leave it up to your child to reach out to your contact.

Then, you can help your child from behind the scenes. Like helping him or her think of appropriate questions to ask your contact. And how to respect your contact’s time. Teach them this type of etiquette they can apply throughout their careers.

But do not make the arrangements for your son or daughter. Do not speak for them. By all means never attend the meeting with them. And do not nag them about whether or not they made the call. Give them ownership over their choices by letting it be their choice to call your contact or not.

Instead of being known as a “lawnmower parent” who mows down your child’s obstacles, defy the stereotypes and be the parent who builds up opportunities for your son and daughter to learn how to take initiative and ownership over their career.

I guarantee this will make them more successful than you can imagine!

“Take the bubble wrap off and let them walk into their mistakes.” Kristen Hadeed

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Sunday Inspiration: Take the Risk!

Welcome to “Sunday Inspiration,” a bi-weekly devotional for those seeking spiritual encouragement in the pursuit of their passions. Each post comes from an outside resource (as referenced). I hope these posts will inspire and motivate you in your life and career in addition to our weekly original blog posts. Enjoy!

“Give it to the one who risked the most.” Mt 25:28 TM

Remember the three stewards who were each given a sum of money to invest? The first two doubled theirs; the third buried his in the ground. The first two were promoted; the third was fired.

“Get rid of this ‘play-it-safe’…won’t go out on a limb” (v. 30 TM).

Could there be a more powerful incentive to taking a risk of faith based on what God promised you?

You say, “But what if I fail?”

Failure trains you for success! It can show you what you need to change in order to move forward.

Think of it this way: As a redeemed child of God you have a security net that allows you to fail safely.

But if your reputation and self-worth are all tied up in knots over some failed enterprise, you’ll not be motivated to try again.

It’s human nature to want to feel good, to succeed, to win the prize, to move forward. But just like a world-class athlete backs up to gain the momentum to run faster, sometimes a few steps backward now will fuel your progress later.

And here’s something else to keep in mind: God assesses our accomplishments differently than people. A failure in the eyes of men is often a success in the eyes of God.

Remember Noah? Before the flood he looked like a loser; afterward he became the most successful man on earth.

Your most fulfilling reward isn’t human approval—it’s God’s “Well done…good and faithful servant!” (Mt 25:21 NIV).

So take the risk!

Source: https://www.jentezenfranklin.org/daily-devotions/take-the-risk-2

Sunday Inspiration: Prepare Yourself

Welcome to “Sunday Inspiration,” a bi-weekly devotional for those seeking spiritual encouragement in the pursuit of their passions. Each post comes from an outside resource (as referenced). I hope these posts will inspire and motivate you in your life and career in addition to our weekly original blog posts. Enjoy!

Disclaimer: the nature of this post and its wording is not intended to support any political views or agendas. Instead, it is intended to reiterate the importance of career preparation as outlined in my most recent blog post, “How to Know When It’s Time to Get Career Help.”

In fact, this post isn’t about politics at all. It’s only about helping you achieve your life and career goals.

Any similarities or timeliness to current political events is purely coincidental.

Besides, it was written by someone else a couple of years ago, so I can’t take credit for it. I’m just thinking its deeper message might speak to someone who currently finds themselves working hard on their goals and in need of a word of encouragement to keep going. Whoever you are, enjoy and be encouraged!

“We rebuilt the wall…for the people worked with all their heart.” Nehemiah 4:6 NIV

To succeed, Nehemiah needed favor with his boss, the king. So he prayed that this heathen potentate would finance the rebuilding of the walls of Jerusalem. It was a bold prayer, and it wasn’t answered overnight. But Nehemiah didn’t sit around waiting.

In the meantime he put together a plan, assembled a team, and scheduled a date to begin the work. That way when the king said yes, he was ready to move.

Some folks think if God’s going to do something, why should we do anything?

Then there are those who think they don’t need God at all, so they try to do it on their own.

But both extremes are wrong.

Sometimes God has to balance what He’s doing in your life with what He’s doing in somebody else’s life, so that “all things work together for good” (Ro 8:28).

In Nehemiah’s case, waiting for a letter of authorization from the king and funding for the project was like waiting for a government grant—it can take a while. But the Bible says, “The king’s heart is like channels of water in the hand of the Lord; He turns it wherever He wishes” (Pr 21:1 NAS).

Nehemiah exercised bold confidence in God’s willingness to provide. He also understood that while he was waiting, it was his responsibility to prepare and set things in place so that when God gave him the green light he was ready to move.

He exercised faith—and wisdom. He knew he couldn’t do God’s part, and that God wouldn’t do his part.

So the word for you today is: “Prepare yourself!”

Source: https://www.jentezenfranklin.org/daily-devotions/prepare-yourself-2