Tag: goal setting


How to Stay Focused on Your Goals During the Remainder of the Pandemic

“Focus precedes success.” Bobb Biehl

Last week I shared with you a goal-setting method for those who hate goal-setting. It appeals more to people who like problem-solving.

But whether you prefer problem-solving over traditional goal-setting methods, or vice versa, it’s important to stay focused.

So how do you stay focused on your goals and solutions, especially during a pandemic?

Taking stock during a pandemic

At the beginning of 2020, I set some goals for myself like I do every year. But then the pandemic occurred which threw a wrench into my plans.

However, instead of letting the mandatory quarantine totally derail my goals, I chose to focus on those I could work on during the extended lockdown.

One of the things I did to stay focused on those goals was to follow what I teach my clients. I help them not just set goals but achieve them so they can pursue their passions in life.

I have an 8-step method to achieving goals which has always worked for me, and also works for many of my clients.

The method has helped me achieve several short-term objectives over the past few years that have added up to the achievement of some long-term and ongoing goals.

The goals I continually focus on include:
  • Improving my career coaching business.
  • Paying off any and all debts.
  • Saving more money.
  • Learning new things.
  • Having fun and adventurous experiences.
  • Growing spiritually.
For example, in the past 12 months I…
  • released my 3rd book
  • took a writing class
  • completed a six-month jiu-jitsu fitness class
  • increased my business’s revenue by 47% and profit by 33%
  • spent more time traveling to see family
  • took a vacation to Florida
  • went on a silent retreat
  • paid off my car
  • and got on track to pay off my home two years early

…all while running a business, recovering from a shoulder injury, helping my uncle in Knoxville who’s ill, and having to undergo surgery this past January.

I’m not special. Anyone can accomplish similar goals, as long as they stay focused and follow through on their goals.

4 things that keep me focused on my goals

When I look at the above list considering all I had on my plate, I wonder how in the world I’d accomplished so much in such a short time.

But I know there were four things that helped me stay focused and achieve all of the above:

#1. Writing down my goals

The simple act of writing down my goals made it more likely for me to achieve them.

I noticed most of the things I wrote down got accomplished, while most of the things I didn’t write down, didn’t get accomplished.

In fact, statistics indicate that people who write down their goals are 50% more likely to achieve their goals than those who don’t.

So even if the pandemic is preventing you from accomplishing some of your goals, you can use this time to put them in writing or update the ones you’ve already written down.

#2. Following a plan

I practiced what I preach by following the 8-Step Goal-Achievement Plan I’ve developed for my clients.

You don’t have to be a paNASH client to utilize this plan. It’s available for free when you subscribe to my basic, advanced, or premium subscription services. (Click here to see what’s included in each subscription level.)

Now may be a good time to start planning some future goals, even if you don’t yet know the full impact of the pandemic on your future plans. You can start planning now, and then you’ll already have something to tweak if necessary in the near future.

#3. Tracking my goals

I kept track of my goals and the steps to achieving them in my Passion Planner.

A Passion Planner is a wonderful calendar resource letting you map out your goals for the year and then showing you how to prioritize the steps to achieving those goals.

“The key to balance is scheduling your priorities a year in advance.” Bobb Biehl (executive coach and author)

The other great thing about the Passion Planner is it has wonderful reflection questions at the end of each month, such as:

  • What were the three biggest lessons you learned this past month?
  • How are you different between this past month and the month before it?
  • What three things can you improve on this upcoming month?

Also, the Passion Planner comes in an academic version starting in August and going to July 2021. And it comes in an undated version, letting you start anytime. These calendar options are especially helpful if you feel like chucking the awful first half of 2020 and starting again with a do-over!

#4. Staying disciplined

Staying disciplined is the most important key to keeping myself focused on my goals!

Like I said earlier, I’m not special. It just takes commitment to sit down and plan what I want to accomplish, diligence to complete the necessary steps, and discipline to follow through on what I tell myself I’m going to do.

And when life throws a curve ball like a pandemic, I remain flexible to revisit, rethink, and retweak my original goals and solutions.

You can do this too!

Stay focused during the remainder of the pandemic

Without these four things, I never, ever would’ve been able to achieve all I have in the past 12 months.

While other methods work better for some people, this is what works best for me in staying focused on my goals.

I’ve also seen it work well for many of my clients. Perhaps it could work for you too!

Just imagine what you can accomplish this summer as you continue during this pandemic to find more time for what’s most important in life.

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How to Set Post-Quarantine Goals When You Hate Goal-Setting

Last week I talked about how it’s time for a 2020 do-over. Although our first quarter goals got chucked out the window due to the coronavirus, we now have the opportunity for a do-over as we slowly enter post-quarantine.

But maybe the method I shared last week for having a successful do-over doesn’t resonate for you. Maybe you’re less of a visionary or planner, and instead are more of a problem solver.

If this is the case, there’s also a method available to problem solvers like you to help you achieve your post-quarantine goals.

Goal-setting for those who hate goal-setting

There are all kinds of ways to set goals and several resources available for goal-setting as outlined below. I personally have used various ways such as vision boards, mind mapping, lists, and my Passion Planner calendar.

But if problem solving is more your thing than goal-setting, listen up! There’s a simple way to set goals from a problem-solver’s perspective according to Bobb Biehl. It’s a great method for those who cringe at the thought of setting goals but light up at opportunities for troubleshooting.

Here’s how it works:  create a chart first listing 2-3 problems in your life you want to solve. Then think about what goals would help solve those problems. Finally, list the opportunities you have surrounding those problems and goals. The opportunities are the steps you would take to solving your problems and, as a result, will achieve your goals.

Here’s what the chart looks like:

By starting with a focus on the problems first, you’ll be more motivated to set goals since this approach matches your skills and your preferred method of working.

Even though I’m not one who gets excited about problem-solving, I decided in this post-quarantine time to use the above method. It’s actually helped me think of some goals I may not have considered having not followed this approach. It’s even flexible enough to allow me to incorporate some of the other goal-setting tools I’ve used in the past.

The best resources for post-quarantine goal-setting

No matter how you prefer to set your post-quarantine goals, I encourage you to utilize the resources I’ve provided over the years that have also helped me achieve my own goals.

These resources include the 8-Step Goal-Achievement Plan, a 15-page resource designed to help you get out of a rut, free with any subscription option, including the free basic option.

This free basic plan also includes:

  • Weekly blog post alerts, letting you know the minute I’ve posted my most recent blog and audio posts on topics such as career change, career etiquette, pursuing your passions, interviewing, and more.
  • Bi-weekly “Sunday Inspiration” posts which are full of encouragement and motivation.

You also have the option to upgrade your subscription and receive the following:

  • One complimentary résumé critique
  • Earned credits for one-on-one career coaching
  • A “fast pass” for priority scheduling
  • 5 e-books on various job search topics
  • 8 career success video courses (save an additional $200 off the regular price for the on-demand bundle)

For more details or to subscribe, click here.

By using the above methods and resources, you’ll be able to look back one day and see just how much you’ve accomplished in your life and your career.

Happy post-quarantine, and stay well!

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It’s Time for a 2020 Do-Over!

Remember how excited you were in January about the start of a new year and a new decade? You thought 2020 was going to be a year of new promises and new beginnings.

In January, I wrote a lot about how to set goals and make the best of a new year and new decade. And you used this advice to make new goals for yourself.

Then, everything stopped, causing you and me both to put some goals on hold. This gave us time to reflect on what’s most important, what we have to do differently, and what we want to do differently.

In fact, earlier this week I posted the question:

“There are now things we have to change, but also things we get to change. What’s one thing you’re excited about changing as a result of the current crisis?”

In other words, we’ve all been given the opportunity for a do-over!

As things start to re-open and slowly return to normal, I encourage you to ask yourself:

“How am I going to use my do-over for the better?”

Method to a successful do-over

In looking back over my previous posts at the beginning of 2020, the same advice for your goals then, also applies to your new post-quarantine goals. Here’s how to put your do-over goals into action.

1. Visualize it

Start by visualizing the success you want to have with your do-over. Close your eyes and picture yourself having already achieved this success.

What do you see?

Go back to your vision board I talked about in one of my previous posts and see what you might need to add to it. Look at it on a regular basis as a reminder of what you’re working toward.

Repeat this step again at least once every six months.

2. Prepare for it

Now, taking your vision, work backward to determine what steps must be taken to arrive at your do-over goals.

Do you need to learn something new through training or additional education?

Do you need to expand your network?

Or, do you need to just gather the courage to take a calculated risk?

Use a mind map like the example in my post “Are You Happy With What You Accomplished This Past Decade?” to help you plot your steps for success.

Then, consider if there’s anything you can begin now that will be required of you once you’ve achieved the success you seek. Map out those steps as well on your mind map.

Update your mind map at the beginning of each new year.

3. Trust in God

Like Amanda Foust said in “How To Find Peace About The Future,”

“We need to accept that the future is unpredictable in some ways, but what we do now does have an effect on where we will be later…Understanding our lack of control, continuing to work hard in the present, and letting God handle our future is the only sure way we will find peace.”

Once you’ve done the first two steps of visualizing your success and preparing for it, all you can do at this point is trust everything will work out the way it’s supposed to, as long as you’ve done your part.

It’s at this point you have to develop patience to see the fruits of your labor. And you must learn flexibility in case success might look different than you originally envisioned.

It may take a while to develop patience and flexibility, so allow yourself time to be molded in this way.

Believe in the success of your do-over

Success doesn’t just come from achieving your goals. It also comes from believing you can achieve them.

Start by using the 8-Step Goal-Achievement Plan, a free gift when you subscribe to any of paNASH’s subscription plans.

I encourage you to do what’s within your control. Recognize when you still have more to do. And know when you need to take a break and let God do the rest.

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Do You Need to Make a To-Don’t List?

Last week I wrote about how to say no and have more time for your passions. One of the things I mentioned that could help you manage your time better was creating what I call a TO-DON’T list.

Perhaps you’re one of those people who always make to-do lists and relish the feeling of checking off each item.

But to be successful and less stressed in our day-to-day lives, sometimes we need a TO-DON’T list.

I use a paper calendar called a Passion Planner which already comes with a section blocked off for each month where you can add “not-to-do” items in addition to your to-do items.

What Is a TO-DON’T List?

A TO-DON’T list has on it those things we shouldn’t waste our time and energy doing.

It’s probably the harder of the two types of lists to follow since most items are ones we have to remember time and time again not to do. We can’t just not do it once and check it off. We have to refer back to it, remember it, and develop it as a habit.

This can also take a lot of energy.

But, if you spend your energy working on your TO-DON’T list, you’ll save more energy in the long-run.

Below is an example of a TO-DON’T list. It’s my own personal TO-DON’T list for 2020.

Feel free to personalize it for yourself so you can de-stress and focus your energies on your personal and professional goals.

My TO-DON’T List:

  1. Spend time on meaningless things that distract me from my goals, like scrolling through my phone.
  2. Forget to maintain personal and professional relationships.
  3. Choose work projects which don’t support my company’s mission.
  4. Censor myself too much on my blog. I want to be more transparent so others can learn from my experiences instead of worrying they will think I’m talking too much about myself.
  5. Do anything that doesn’t support or line up with my personal mission statement.

Do you have a personal mission statement? If not, add this to your to-do list! It can serve as the basis for helping you make difficult choices when faced with different opportunities.

You can learn how to come up with your own personal mission statement in my book Personal Branding: Why You Need to Know What Makes You YOUnique and AWEthentic.

Your TO-DON’T List

What do you need to add to your own TO-DON’T list?

Perhaps you don’t need to continue feeling stuck in your current job.

Maybe you don’t need to keep putting off pursuing your passions or letting lack of confidence stand in your way.

Or, you don’t need to put off getting help in these areas any longer.

If this is the case for you, add to your to-do list, “Fill out the paNASH intake form.” It’s a simple item you can check off your list to get you started on a brighter future!

Related post:

How to Say No and Have More Time For Your Passions

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How to Say No and Have More Time For Your Passions

In last week’s post entitled “The Best New Year’s Resolutions to Boost Your Career,” I gave you seven resolutions to try this new year. One of those resolutions was to do less so you can have more time to focus on your personal and professional goals.

This may sound impossible, especially given your current work schedule and all the other resolutions you’ve made for yourself this year.

But there are several things you can do less of  to carve out more time for your goals and passions.

Say yes less and learn how to say no more

It can be hard to say no, especially for people-pleasers. Anytime you’re faced with a task, activity, or event, ask yourself the following questions before immediately responding with “yes.”

  • Will I enjoy it?
  • Does it earn income?
  • Will it open up more quality time with my family?
  • Is it something leading me one step closer toward a goal of mine, like starting my own business?
  • Does it support my personal mission statement?

If you can’t answer yes to at least three of the above questions, say no or delay giving a commitment if you need to think about it some more. Perhaps you can say yes, but need to set some clear parameters or boundaries. For instance, you may agree to help with the task but for only a certain amount of time.

Most importantly, make sure you measure the opportunity against your personal mission statement to see if it supports it or distracts from it. If you don’t have a personal mission statement, check out my post “How to Make Your Big Decisions More Simple” to help you create one.

If you realize it’s best to say no to the request, do so politely. Simply say, “I appreciate you thinking of me, but unfortunately it’s not something I can commit to at this time.” You don’t have to give any further explanation.

If the person doesn’t respect your response and keeps pushing the issue, keep repeating the above statement without changing it or adding anything to it. He or she will eventually accept your response or move on.

Outsource what you can

If the task or activity is an obligation, determine if it can be delegated our outsourced. While you may not like the idea of paying to outsource the task, the time saved from hiring someone can open up more time for you to do work you find more enjoyable and more profitable.

For instance, housework is a necessary evil and it has to get done. Some weeks I have more clients and more billable hours than I have time to spend doing my housework. But if I can make more money in an hour or two doing a job I love than I’d spend on a visit from a housekeeper, it makes more financial sense to pay the housekeeper so I can have the time to make more money and grow my business. Plus, not having to spend the extra time cleaning frees me up to spend time with friends or family.

When considering what can be delegated or outsourced, choose to delegate or outsource the tasks you enjoy least or make you the least money yet require the most time.

Work within your skill set

Make sure you’re spending your time working within your skill set. Don’t expend time or energy trying to get better at the things you’re not good at. Instead, let those be the things you delegate or outsource.

When I do presentations on the topic of personal branding, I often ask the audience why it’s important to know your weaknesses. The usually say it’s so you can know what skills you need to learn or improve. But this is not the correct answer. Instead, it’s so you can know what to say no to.

Do the things you do best and forget the rest. Stop trying to fit a square peg into a round hole or you’ll just get frustrated and waste your time. You were created with certain gifts. You’re a good steward of those gifts when you’re using them instead of trying to take on someone else’s gifts.

Be selective in who you work with

You don’t always get to choose your boss or co-workers, but on the occasions you do, only work with those who are receptive to what you’re doing.

This is especially important if you’re starting your own business. If a potential client or partner doesn’t get your vision or mission, don’t waste your time trying to sell them on it. Save this time and energy for those who do get it.

This is why I’m selective in who I take on as clients. The ones who see the importance of career coaching and understand their return on investment make my work so much more enjoyable and less stressful.

If you do have to work with someone difficult, keep any necessary interactions with the person as short and limited as possible. During those interactions stick to facts. Don’t express your emotions to someone who can’t be trusted with them. Also, establish boundaries and repeat them if necessary. And above all else, remain professional.

Downsize

If you’re spending more time and money having to maintain your material possessions, it’s probably time to downsize.

Get rid of the stuff that costs you more to maintain than it provides you convenience. Better yet, sell those items and use the money as seed money to start your own business or side hustle.

I promise, you won’t miss those things tying you down.

Say no to time-suckage activities

While you’re at it, also eliminate any unproductive activities sucking up all your time. This includes scrolling through social media, binge watching Netflix, talking on the phone with people who only want to gossip instead of talking about more meaningful things.

At the very least, reduce the amount of time you do these things by 30%.

With all the free time you gain back, use it to learn a new skill, read a book, or write a business plan for your own company you hope to start.

Screen your calls

I have a personal rule. If I don’t recognize the number calling me, I don’t answer it.

I’m surprised how many people don’t do this. Especially given the number of robo-calls people get these days. If it’s important, the person calling will leave a message.

Manage your time better

Sometimes finding more time for your passions simply requires you to revisit some tried and true time management practices. This includes setting deadlines for the obligations you can’t delegate or outsource. Put those things on your calendar.

Speaking of calendars, once you’ve incorporated some of the above suggestions in your life, look to see how much time has been freed up on your calendar. Write in the productive things you now want to use this time for in pursuing your passions.

In addition, if you like to make a to-do list for everything, consider writing a to-don’t list too. This can also help you manage your time better.

Get over your FOMO and say no

Some of the above suggestions may make you feel like you’re missing out on some things. But consider what you’re really missing out on if you say no. It will be the things that have no real pay-off in your life.

Sometimes the joy of missing out (JOMO) can free you up for the things you should say yes to and should never miss out on.

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