Tag: #followyourpassions


5 Ways to Discover New Passions in Your Life

Originally published on The Daily Positive.

Is it time for you to learn something new or try something again? Is there a place you’ve never visited? I challenge you to step out of your comfort zone, explore your surroundings, and talk to interesting people. Here’s how doing so can lead to new passions:

1. Try something new.

When we open ourselves up to new experiences, we discover passions we never imagined! If I was told three years ago I would be spending my free time stand-up paddle boarding down the river, I wouldn’t believe it. And if I was told this new passion would trigger a career change, I really wouldn’t believe it. This all came from taking a beginner paddle boarding class. If you think you’d like to start paddle boarding or even just know more about it check out the paddle guru.

new passions

2. Try something old.

The first time I tried rock climbing I was horrible and thought I could never do it. A couple years later, I tried again, and surprisingly, I could! What was the difference? Just a little tweak in my approach. I listened to what an expert said about using my legs more than my arms. This made a huge difference!

Don’t assume because you failed at something once, you’ll fail again. Try a different approach!

3. Travel.

I know a woman who discovered a unique passion when she traveled to Italy. While there, she learned the time-honored art of bookbinding by hand. First, bookbinding became a hobby for her, and now it’s her full-time job! If she had never visited Italy, she may still be stuck in her previously miserable career.

New places or even a simple change of scenery can lead you down a path you never knew existed. You don’t have to travel far away, new passions can be discovered somewhere within driving distance too. 

4.  Pay attention to your surroundings.

When you pay attention to your surroundings, you’ll discover new opportunities for new passions to arise. Sometimes just inquiring about something that catches your eye can lead to a newly discovered passion.

Many cities and local colleges host community classes on topics within arts, languages, computers, etc. In the past, I’ve taken a photography class, an archery class, and even a fly-fishing class. I’ve also taught some classes! This year I plan to take a marketing class and a financial success class. Pay attention to the opportunities around you! 

5. Talk to people.

A few years ago a friend of mine and his girlfriend were traveling in Florida when they noticed a van with the picture of a stand-up paddle boarder on it. They inquired about it and discovered a place where they could learn to paddle board. The first day, they fell in the water several times but went back a second day to try again. They quickly became so passionate about this experience they decided to open their own paddle boarding company. They talked to everyone in the business to learn as much as they could. Nine months later, they opened their own paddle shop with much success! Their success happened just from expressing an interest and learning from the people around them.

New Passions

Everyone has the opportunity to discover new passions.

Find more ways to do so in the complimentary on-demand webinar 5 Ways to Pursue Your Passions in Work and Life.

Click here for more ways to pursue new passions.

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Too Old for Gold? Age Is Just a Number

Like most people, I’ve been watching the Olympics the past week and a half. It is the best way to witness people’s pursuit of their passions in action. What I love most about the Olympics and sports in general is the inspiration and encouragement it provides for everyone who has a passion and a dream.

You’re Never Too Old…

One story in particular I am personally inspired by this Olympic season is of the Uzbekistan gymnast Oksana Chusovitina. Oksana is 41-years-old competing in her SEVENTH Olympics (and still hasn’t ruled out Tokyo!) in a sport where age 21 is considered “old.” Oksana is my “shero” because she and I are almost the same age (I’ve got a year on her), and she is not letting her age be an obstacle to her dreams and her passions.

Most people in her position would tell themselves they are “too old.” Too old for what, I ask? Tell that to the 85-year-old woman I met while recently volunteering for the Senior Olympics. By the time she had made it to the event I was working, she had already competed and medaled in NINE other events over the previous three days.

…Or Too Young

On the flip side of this, I was recently working with a new client who shared with me that one of her self-talk limiting beliefs (a perceived obstacle) is she is “too young.” I found this surprising coming from someone who works as an actress, also a career where time and age are against you. My response was, “too young for what?” When I delved deeper into where this limiting belief came from, I discovered she suffers from the same thing I do, “youngest-sibling-syndrome.”

Age Is Just a Number

The point is, age is just a number. We have the choice to let our circumstances, others’ opinions, or even our own negative self-talk control our lives. Or, we have the choice to be inspired and moved by the examples of those who ignore all the “you can’t because of your age” talk and say to themselves, “I can, even if I fail in my attempt.”

From the judges’ perspective, Oksana failed miserably in her landing of her vault. Upon landing so hard she ended up going into a flip on the mat. From my perspective, she should have gotten extra points for the extra flip, for making such a failed landing look so graceful, and for experience!

Change Your Limiting Beliefs

If you have a God-given desire in you to try something you may consider to be either “too old” or “too young” for, ask yourself these questions:

  • What is this limiting belief keeping me from?
  • What would be the worst-case scenario if I keep believing this?
  • How can I turn this belief around to a more positive statement?
  • How can I benefit from believing the more positive statement?
  • What would be the best-case scenario if I start believing the positive statement?

Be honest in your answers. For more inspiration, check out these other blog posts:

Discover New Passions

Discover New Passions

This week’s paNASH blog is actually a link to an article on “5 Ways to Discover New PassionsI recently wrote for The Daily Positive, a popular blog site first created by Dale Partridge and designed to include writings that inspire you to live a life of purpose.

I’ve always enjoyed reading the insightful posts from the writers and contributors of TDP, and am honored to have my article featured along side theirs. Click on over to read it and sign up for their newsletter so you can receive even more inspirational and helpful articles!

5 Ways To Discover New Passions

P.S.

The tips in this article are just a small sampling of what I cover in my complimentary webinar “5 Ways to Pursue Your Passions in Life and Work.” If you missed the first webinar, don’t worry! I’ll be hosting it again the evening of September 8th.

And yes, I know that’s the same night as the NFL season opener, but don’t despair. I want to see that Panthers-Broncos rematch too! We’ll be done an hour before kickoff. So get off the sidelines and start actively participating in the trajectory of your life and career! (Click here to register.)

Combine Your Passions to Create Opportunity

When helping my clients, one thing I like to do is encourage them to brainstorm ways they can combine their passions. An example of this is someone who has a love for sports and for photography parlaying that into a part-time or full-time job as a sports photographer. Or, someone who is studying music but also loves children and helping people could focus their career plans toward music therapy at a children’s hospital.

Taking your hobbies and passions a step further

I recently saw this quote on Pinterest and totally agree…

three hobbies

…but I also like to ask, “How can you take this a step further and find some overlap between the three?” What if you found one passion or hobby that made you money AND kept you in shape? Or one that let you earn money while exploring your creative hobby?

My own example

I’ve worked hard to try to do the same for myself. It’s taken a while to make each of my passions (spirituality, coaching, writing, and stand up paddle boarding) fit in a way that makes sense, but it finally came together this past year. About two years ago I discovered a passion for stand up paddle boarding which is a fun way for me to keep in shape in one of my favorite places:  on the water! While doing this, I started seeing a parallel between the lessons I gained from stand up paddling and the lessons in Scripture. I decided to use my creative juices for writing to start recording those parallels in the form of a devotional blog called SUP:  Spiritual Understanding & Prayer (on a SUP board).

But I still had a desire to figure out a way to incorporate stand up paddling in my work as a career and life coach. This took the longest to come together, but when I changed my business over from an image consulting company to a career and life coaching service, it suddenly became very clear how I could accomplish this. I could actually conduct a coaching session with clients on the water (using my spare board), and could translate the SUP beginner lessons with the things they are dealing with in life and work. For instance, how to achieve not just physical balance (obviously necessary for SUP), but also work-life balance.

Results

I have already taken a few clients out this summer and so far I’ve received great feedback from them. One said that because she did crew in college, going out to the river felt familiar to her which eased her nervousness about trying SUP. She said in turn, that has helped ease her nervousness before job interviews because of the techniques I’ve taught her for job interviewing makes each interview feel familiar and less nerve-wracking than before.

Another client has said that just being on the water left her feeling rejuvenated both physically and mentally, and ready to take on life’s next challenge. For me, it’s awesome that I get to use my passion for stand up paddle boarding and my skill for teaching a new hobby to make money while helping others, introducing them to something new, and getting a little exercise in all at the same time!

How can you combine your passions?

Whatever your hobbies are, I encourage you to start thinking about how you can combine your passions for maximum benefits, whether that means earning a profit, getting more exercise built into your routine, getting your creative juices flowing, or all three! One way to start getting ideas is by completing the 8-Step Goal-Achievement Plan which you will begin receiving for free when you subscribe to the paNASH newsletter.

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3 Excuses Keeping You In Your Comfort Zone

Yesterday I read a great post by Nashville’s own Allison Fallon entitled “3 Excuses That Keep Smart, Creative People Trapped.” I wanted to share her insights here because it’s so relevant for my readers.

When considering taking on a new coaching client, one of the questions I ask in the paNASH intake form is “Which do you wish you had more of:  time, money, or confidence?”

The reason I ask this question is because I’m trying to determine what might be an obstacle (whether real or perceived) that’s standing in your way of getting out of your comfort zone and pursuing your passions.

But sometimes obstacles can become excuses.

I loved how Fallon addressed the three most common excuses:  lack of money, not enough time, and fear.

Lack of Money Excuses

Fallon makes the point that “we allocate money for the things we decide matters.”

She then poses the question, “How would it change your money excuse if you were able to believe you matter?”

I see people who have no problems spending money on pet therapy for their dog. But they don’t believe they deserve an investment in career coaching. They give their pets things and experiences they know the pet will love. But they don’t think they’re worth the money to pursue their own passions.

One of my colleagues always says, “Show me your bank account and I’ll show you what matters to you.”

Not Enough Time Excuses

This same colleague also says, “Show me your calendar and I’ll show you what’s important to you.”

Unlike money, we’re all given an equal amount of time, so it’s a little harder to make this excuse fly.

It’s here where I want to insert an excerpt from Fallon’s article to really get to the heart of this particular excuse:

“I don’t have enough time to paint or draw or write or start a business because I am an incredibly busy, productive person and I don’t see how that thing is going to produce measurable results in my life.”

To this excuse, I would say: we live in a culture that is obsessed with productivity. Everything is measured by how much money it can generate, how much progress it can help us make. Thank you industrialization. And while there’s nothing wrong with productivity, the problem I see comes when we begin to worship productivity and forget that some of the most valuable things in life produce results so slowly, they are hard to measure.

In fact, consider some things that might be considered “un-productive”:

  • Getting more sleep
  • Taking a long walk
  • Daily journaling
  • Spending time with our children
  • Reading books
  • Working out
  • Saying “no” to an opportunity
  • Going to therapy

Are these things un-productive, or are they just slow-producing?

Over time, we will begin to see the fruits of our labor. But if we are desperate to see progress right away, we might feel disappointed. Some of the most valuable progress we can make in our life often happens under the surface, where nobody (including us) can see it.

Fear Excuses

Fallon says that once you’re able to say you’re afraid, you’re being more honest because the first two excuses are usually based in fear.

Fear of what?

It could be fear of failure, fear of success, fear of the unknown, fear of loss of control, etc.

It’s important to remember that everyone has fear, and it’s always going to rear its ugly head. It’s knowing how to view fear as Fallon describes in her article. And how to deal with and overcome fear as I explain in my recent post “Overcoming Fear“.

This can eliminate the excuses and get you out of your comfort zone!

Are You Ready?

Are you ready to stop making excuses, and start making yourself worth “it,” whatever “it” means for you?

If you still have concerns about money, time or fear, the best way to get started is with small commitments. You can access paNASH’s on-demand videos on various topics that are affordable (some are free!) and allow you test the waters and work at your own pace. Click here to learn more.