Tag: career advice


How to Say No and Have More Time For Your Passions

In last week’s post entitled “The Best New Year’s Resolutions to Boost Your Career,” I gave you seven resolutions to try this new year. One of those resolutions was to do less so you can have more time to focus on your personal and professional goals.

This may sound impossible, especially given your current work schedule and all the other resolutions you’ve made for yourself this year.

But there are several things you can do less of  to carve out more time for your goals and passions.

Say yes less and learn how to say no more

It can be hard to say no, especially for people-pleasers. Anytime you’re faced with a task, activity, or event, ask yourself the following questions before immediately responding with “yes.”

  • Will I enjoy it?
  • Does it earn income?
  • Will it open up more quality time with my family?
  • Is it something leading me one step closer toward a goal of mine, like starting my own business?
  • Does it support my personal mission statement?

If you can’t answer yes to at least three of the above questions, say no or delay giving a commitment if you need to think about it some more. Perhaps you can say yes, but need to set some clear parameters or boundaries. For instance, you may agree to help with the task but for only a certain amount of time.

Most importantly, make sure you measure the opportunity against your personal mission statement to see if it supports it or distracts from it. If you don’t have a personal mission statement, check out my post “How to Make Your Big Decisions More Simple” to help you create one.

If you realize it’s best to say no to the request, do so politely. Simply say, “I appreciate you thinking of me, but unfortunately it’s not something I can commit to at this time.” You don’t have to give any further explanation.

If the person doesn’t respect your response and keeps pushing the issue, keep repeating the above statement without changing it or adding anything to it. He or she will eventually accept your response or move on.

Outsource what you can

If the task or activity is an obligation, determine if it can be delegated our outsourced. While you may not like the idea of paying to outsource the task, the time saved from hiring someone can open up more time for you to do work you find more enjoyable and more profitable.

For instance, housework is a necessary evil and it has to get done. Some weeks I have more clients and more billable hours than I have time to spend doing my housework. But if I can make more money in an hour or two doing a job I love than I’d spend on a visit from a housekeeper, it makes more financial sense to pay the housekeeper so I can have the time to make more money and grow my business. Plus, not having to spend the extra time cleaning frees me up to spend time with friends or family.

When considering what can be delegated or outsourced, choose to delegate or outsource the tasks you enjoy least or make you the least money yet require the most time.

Work within your skill set

Make sure you’re spending your time working within your skill set. Don’t expend time or energy trying to get better at the things you’re not good at. Instead, let those be the things you delegate or outsource.

When I do presentations on the topic of personal branding, I often ask the audience why it’s important to know your weaknesses. The usually say it’s so you can know what skills you need to learn or improve. But this is not the correct answer. Instead, it’s so you can know what to say no to.

Do the things you do best and forget the rest. Stop trying to fit a square peg into a round hole or you’ll just get frustrated and waste your time. You were created with certain gifts. You’re a good steward of those gifts when you’re using them instead of trying to take on someone else’s gifts.

Be selective in who you work with

You don’t always get to choose your boss or co-workers, but on the occasions you do, only work with those who are receptive to what you’re doing.

This is especially important if you’re starting your own business. If a potential client or partner doesn’t get your vision or mission, don’t waste your time trying to sell them on it. Save this time and energy for those who do get it.

This is why I’m selective in who I take on as clients. The ones who see the importance of career coaching and understand their return on investment make my work so much more enjoyable and less stressful.

If you do have to work with someone difficult, keep any necessary interactions with the person as short and limited as possible. During those interactions stick to facts. Don’t express your emotions to someone who can’t be trusted with them. Also, establish boundaries and repeat them if necessary. And above all else, remain professional.

Downsize

If you’re spending more time and money having to maintain your material possessions, it’s probably time to downsize.

Get rid of the stuff that costs you more to maintain than it provides you convenience. Better yet, sell those items and use the money as seed money to start your own business or side hustle.

I promise, you won’t miss those things tying you down.

Say no to time-suckage activities

While you’re at it, also eliminate any unproductive activities sucking up all your time. This includes scrolling through social media, binge watching Netflix, talking on the phone with people who only want to gossip instead of talking about more meaningful things.

At the very least, reduce the amount of time you do these things by 30%.

With all the free time you gain back, use it to learn a new skill, read a book, or write a business plan for your own company you hope to start.

Screen your calls

I have a personal rule. If I don’t recognize the number calling me, I don’t answer it.

I’m surprised how many people don’t do this. Especially given the number of robo-calls people get these days. If it’s important, the person calling will leave a message.

Manage your time better

Sometimes finding more time for your passions simply requires you to revisit some tried and true time management practices. This includes setting deadlines for the obligations you can’t delegate or outsource. Put those things on your calendar.

Speaking of calendars, once you’ve incorporated some of the above suggestions in your life, look to see how much time has been freed up on your calendar. Write in the productive things you now want to use this time for in pursuing your passions.

In addition, if you like to make a to-do list for everything, consider writing a to-don’t list too. This can also help you manage your time better.

Get over your FOMO and say no

Some of the above suggestions may make you feel like you’re missing out on some things. But consider what you’re really missing out on if you say no. It will be the things that have no real pay-off in your life.

Sometimes the joy of missing out (JOMO) can free you up for the things you should say yes to and should never miss out on.

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Here Are the Top 10 Most Popular paNASH Blog Posts of 2019

Can you believe we’ve reached not only the end of another year but also the end of another decade? I’ve been writing much of the past decade, and for the past four years I’ve been writing blog posts on topics related to pursuing your passions and finding new work and career paths that you can be more passionate about.

I’m so grateful to all you readers and listeners who loyally follow the paNASH blog from week to week. I love hearing your stories of how a particular blog post helped you succeed in your job search or your career. Your support and feedback means so much to me!

As a thank you, here’s a collection of the top 10 most popular paNASH blog posts of 2019.

Top 10 Most Popular paNASH Blog Posts of 2019

  1. How to Write Networking Emails That Will Get Responses
  2. What Is the Best Way to Describe Yourself In a Job Interview?
  3. Stop! Watch Out for These 10 Red Flags In Your New Job
  4. How to Know If Your Burnout Is Killing You?
  5. Is There Such a Thing As the Perfect Job? No (and Yes)!
  6. Why You Need to Stop Overthinking Networking
  7. How to Avoid Common Mistakes That Could Ruin Your Career
  8. 5 Things You Should Never Say In a Job Interview
  9. How to Make Your LinkedIn Profile Stand Out
  10. How to Be Patient When You’re In Between Jobs

Please share

Please share any of the above blog posts or other paNASH posts on your social media platforms and with your friends so they can also benefit from them.

Stay tuned

Stay tuned for a new year and a new decade of posts to help you create a career you can be passionate about! If there are any topics you’d like to see covered in the upcoming year, please share your requests in the comment box. Thank you!

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How to Go From Burned Out to Fired Up!

I have so many clients who come to me feeling burned out in their current job. For some of them it’s not from working too much. Instead it’s from working outside their gifting. For others, they love their job and company, but their employers treat them as machines instead of humans!

Burned out from working too much

For those of you who are in a company or job you enjoy but are feeling burned out from overwork, looking for a new job and sending out resumes is probably not the answer right now.

Doing so would be the same as uprooting your family and moving to a house right next door to a restaurant just because you happen to be hungry right now.

Trust me. You don’t want to trade a burnout with a company you love for a burnout with a company you’ll hate.

Have the tough conversation with your boss

Instead, I suggest having a frank conversation with your supervisor, no matter how difficult or scary it may feel.

Former Wall Street CEO (for both Smith Barney and Merrill Lynch) and now entrepreneur Sallie Krawcheck says,

“The days of the boss as ‘hard-ass’ need to be kissed good-bye. Today the business world increasingly values the kind of leaders who recognize that their employees’ lives don’t begin and end when they are at work. Many of us have families, and pets, and outside interests, and medical needs, and hobbies. Really, it’s well past time to get over requiring face time. And work as an extreme sport, complete with all-nighters and last-minute business trips-it isn’t good for employees, and it certainly doesn’t allow anyone to do their best work; and younger professionals are turning away from it in droves. Why not own the fact that we are all people and acknowledge that all of us need time for our outside lives? It’s just smart business.”

Instead of taking the angle of needing some much needed relief from your current workload, take the angle of how you want to be the best and most productive employee you can be for your boss.

Tell him or her how your current workload is negatively impacting your ability to do your best. Then focus on how you can improve your performance and productivity with just a few suggested tweaks.

Propose a win-win-win situation

Think ahead what tweaks you can suggest to be a win-win-win. (A win for your boss that will make him or her look good, a win for the company’s bottom line, and a win for you and your sanity.)

Some examples of tweaks you can suggest may include:

  • Delegating some things to your subordinates.
  • Working remotely from home one to two days a week.
  • Trading travel to in-person site visits for Skype meetings.

A trial period

Give your boss the option to try what you’re suggesting on a trial basis (typically two weeks). Offer to go back to the old way if it doesn’t work.

During those two weeks, track every single positive impact on the company’s bottom line you notice.

Examples of positive outcomes include:

  • Reduction in errors.
  • Financial savings for the company.
  • More satisfied clients/customers.
  • Increase in more qualified prospects.
  • Increase in repeat sales from current customers.
  • Time used more wisely.

Deliver results

Create a report reflecting these positive outcomes and present it to your boss at the end of the two weeks.

Then once you share your positive results, ask your boss for two additional weeks to see if you can repeat what you’ve accomplished in the first two weeks. If you can, he or she will find it hard to justify saying no to an indefinite continuation of your new approach to your workload.

Consider your next move

Only after you’ve had this conversation with your boss should you consider looking for a new job.

If your supervisor likes your work as much as you like working for him or her, you shouldn’t feel paranoid about broaching the subject. In fact, your boss will probably be glad you brought your struggle to his or her attention.

But if your proposal is immediately shot down and it’s obvious your feedback is not appreciated, then you’ll know it’s probably time to look for something new. But I strongly recommend taking some vacation time (even if you don’t go out of town) to really think about if you should leave your job. And if so, for what other kind of job?

Use this time to also figure out your personal mission and purpose in life so you’ll know what opportunities to say yes to and which ones to say no to. Make sure you’re targeting opportunities that allow you to work in your gifting. Otherwise, you’ll end up burned out all over again.

Don’t get burned out on burnout

When looking for something new, do so with a clear mind. Again, use some of your vacation time to take a step back and get some proper perspective on what exactly you want in your next job and what will be a good fit for your personal mission. It will be worth it!

If you need help determining your purpose and gifting, start with paNASH’s on-demand video course on personal branding. Do this before you update your resume and just start sending it out randomly with no real focus.

Don’t get burned out on burnout. If you follow the suggestions above, you can find a new lease on life which can really get you fired up about your career!

Related Posts:

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How to Move Up in Your Career

Lately I’ve had several people contact me who’ve said, “I can’t seem to move up in my career. I keep getting stuck in the same low-level jobs and don’t know how to get out of this cycle and move up to something better. Help!”

Oftentimes there’s a simple explanation for this phenomenon. People take a lower-level job expecting to eventually be promoted to a higher level position, but never take action to ensure this will happen.

The Cycle

The cycle goes like this:

  • You take a lower-level job telling yourself it’s a good foot-in-the-door and will provide an opportunity to grow in the company.
  • You keep your nose to the grindstone and continue to work hard, hoping your boss will notice how good of a worker you are.
  • After the first year, you get passed over for promotion.
  • Then it’s two to three years later and nothing’s changed. You wonder why you’re still stuck in the same position and aren’t advancing.
  • You begin to feel unappreciated, so you decide to look for a job with a different company.
  • However you only apply for the same level job you’ve been in because you think it’s all you’re qualified to do since you haven’t been promoted.
  • You accept the same level job at another company with the same hopes of growing and moving up in the company.

And then the cycle starts all over.

Breaking the Cycle and Creating Real Career Growth

So how do you break this cycle? By going in to a job with an intentional and focused plan.

The people who have suffered through these cycles are in them because they didn’t take responsibility for their own career growth. They went in with no plan of their own and instead expected the higher ups to recognize their potential and promote them.

But, just like a job doesn’t fall into your lap, opportunities for advancement don’t either. You have to do your part to grow in your career. But how?

Below are several actions you can take to jump start a plan for moving up in your career. I’ve also linked each action to paNASH’s various on-demand video courses that show you in more detail how to carry out each action. (Get 15% off each on-demand program from Sept. 18-25 when you enter the discount code FALL2019 at checkout.)

In addition, paNASH provides a one-on-one personalized coaching track focusing solely on career growth. The Career Growth Track provides you an in depth plan you need to break the cycle. Also, it’s perfect for those who’ve just started a new job. It includes:

  • Successful on-boarding in your new job.
  • Preparation for promotion and advancement opportunities.
  • Methods for asking for a raise.
  • “Fire”-proofing yourself.
  • Maintaining joy and challenge in your career.
  • And more!

Don’t stay stuck! Move up!

Don’t stay stuck in your career! The power is in your hands to become unstuck and move up. You just have to learn how to wield your power by following the suggestions above. paNASH can help you do this in two ways:

  1. With paNASH’s on-demand programs available online (get 15% off each online program or the entire bundle from Sept. 18-25 when you enter the discount code FALL2019 at checkout).
  2. And, with the personalized, one-on-one Career Growth coaching track.

Contact paNASH today and break the cycle!

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You Shouldn’t Have to Pay for Your Paycheck! How to Beware of MLMs

Let me preface this post with the fact that there are some people who have made a good living out of direct sales/multi-level marketing (MLMs). But they’re typically the exception and not the rule.

This post is not a judgement of those who work as independent sales reps in direct sales. Instead, it’s a concern over the MLM companies’ questionable structure and unethical practices. It also serves as a warning to those who are in a vulnerable place financially and career-wise and therefore are considering joining an MLM before knowing the facts and risks involved. As a career coach I wouldn’t be doing my job if I didn’t provide the following words of caution.

What are MLMs?

Direct sales is also known as multi-level marketing (MLM). This is where people pay a buy-in fee and purchase inventory to sell a product directly to a customer, while also recruiting others to do the same, earning some money from sales, but mostly from their recruitment and their downline’s sales.

You’ve probably had a “friend” or acquaintance you haven’t heard from in ages hit you up on Facebook wanting to meet for coffee. You agree because you’re so curious as to why they want to meet with you after so long. When you do meet with them, you realize there’s more of an agenda than just coffee and catching up. They want to talk with you about “an amazing career opportunity” guaranteed to “change your life.”

This opportunity will let you be your own boss, work from home, make your own hours, and earn as much money as you’d like. Plus, they say, it provides independence, empowers you, and uplifts you.

This might sound great to some people. Especially those who are at a low point in their lives or careers and need lifting up. Or those who have just lost their jobs or want to spend more time at home with their children.

But are MLMs a viable career option? Can you really make money in an MLM? To answer this question, let’s first look at the statistics.

Consider the truth and understand the risks.

MLM companies are making a fortune, but the participants are NOT. From my research (see sources below), only one percent of people who join MLM companies earn money. The other 99% actually lose money. Some as much as five-figures.

Many MLMs require steep buy-ins, as much as up to $5,000 for some. And depending on the product and the structure of the MLM, these costs continue on a monthly basis due to monthly inventory purchase requirements to stay active and earn rewards. But typically, commissions on inventory sold are very small. Usually there is more emphasis instead on recruiting a downline.

This might sound a lot like a pyramid scheme. Because by definition, it is when the emphasis is on recruitment of a downline.

“One of the hallmarks of an illegal pyramid scheme is a promise that sellers will make money from recruiting others rather than selling the product,” says the Federal Trade Commission.

So if an MLM is pushing you to recruit more than they are pushing you to sell, BEWARE!

And, even if an MLM is legal by the above definition, it’s practices my still be unethical.

MLMs cannot turn you into an entrepreneur!

MLMs promise a “safe” way to become an entrepreneur. News flash: becoming an independent sales consultant for an MLM does not make you an entrepreneur! The only entrepreneur in this game is the one(s) who created the product and created the company itself.

And just because the opportunity lets you make your own hours this also does not make you entrepreneur. So don’t fall for this sales pitch.

There’s not much that’s financially safe about joining an MLM. As stated above, most people who join MLMs lose money. Those who do make a profit average only about a $1,500 profit per year.

You’re likely to be more successful by being a true entrepreneur and starting your own business. The amount of hard work required in MLMs just to stay afloat could be better used to build something more profitable and something you’re truly passionate about.

And you’re likely to be more successful. Statistics show about 39% of small businesses earn a profit over their lifetime versus 1% of MLM reps.

My guess is, there’s probably something you’re more passionate about than just being a glorified distributor for lipstick, leggings, or “nutritional” juices. Why not pursue those passions with the time, energy, and money you’d spend on something you’re not passionate about? At least you’d likely have more to show for it than a garage full of unsold inventory.

MLMs prey on women

Seventy-five percent of people currently signed with an MLM are women. This number is due not only to the type of products, but also to the increased cost of child care forcing women to stay home with their children. There’s no wonder MLMs prey on this predicament.

They use the appeal of working from home, making your own hours, becoming a “mommypreneur” and being a “girl boss” to lure women who are in this financial predicament.

However, instead of seeing their income grow, women who’ve been involved in MLMs have seen their debt grow.

“MLMs are the most despicable form of corporate feminism. They use their ‘you go girl’ branding to trap capable, ambitious women in a worsening cycle of debt. If MLM founders actually believed in empowering women they wouldn’t scam them out of their life savings,” says one journalist.

Ladies, don’t settle for being a “girl boss”. Aspire to be a “woman boss” and take control of your career! You shouldn’t have to pay for your job!

Viable career option, or risky gamble?

If you already have a proven track record as a leader, salesperson, and someone who can REALLY hustle, then joining an MLM could be a viable career option for you. But you need to understand the risks. One journalist has said, “The risk with MLMs is so high you’d be more successful at making money gambling than you would at joining an MLM.”

So before you sign up and pay your buy-in fee, do your research! This includes talking to former reps and participants, finding out why they left, and learning about the products outside of what the company says about the products.

Most of all, find out if the commission on your personal sales is higher than the commission on the sales of your downline. If it is, then it’s likely more reputable than most other MLMs.

I also suggest having another source of income when you first start, whether it’s a full-time or part-time job, and/or a spouse who’s also bringing in an income (with benefits).

Finally, be realistic about how much you can ultimately invest in the opportunity before you risk unmanageable debt. Make sure someone outside of the MLM (a friend or family member) holds you accountable to this amount. So many people get caught up in the recognition and awards that come from the amount of inventory purchased (NOT the amount sold!) they overspend just to reach those recognition goals.

If you already have too much personal debt, it’s not worth the risk at all. Besides, if you have to pay for a job or a paycheck, it’s probably only going to benefit the person receiving your buy-in money, not you!

Sources: http://abcn.ws/1PUpW8I, https://www.finance-guy.net/mlm-reviews, http://www.pinktruth.com/, https://bettingonzero.com/, https://youtu.be/lLBmElR0Luw, https://youtu.be/s6MwGeOm8iI, https://medium.com/@antionetterparker/why-creative-memories-just-couldnt-compete-review-4860f97dcf86

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