paNASH blog


Sunday Inspiration: Don’t Let Fear Stop You (Part 1)

Welcome to “Sunday Inspiration,” a bi-weekly devotional for those seeking spiritual encouragement in the pursuit of their passions. Each post comes from an outside resource (as referenced). I hope these posts will inspire and motivate you in your life and career in addition to our weekly original blog posts. Enjoy!

“He who began a good work in you will carry it on to completion.” Php 1:6 NIV

Has God called you to do something you don’t feel capable of doing? Could you think of a dozen others better suited for the job? It doesn’t matter what you think, God didn’t choose somebody else! He chose you in spite of your limitations and insecurities. Your inadequacies don’t surprise Him. In fact, His “power works best in weakness” (2Co 12:9 NLT). Jon Walker says: “You may…hide your weaknesses from others, but you can’t hide them from God. He created you (do you think He made a mistake?). He created you with weaknesses to keep you on your knees…without them to push you back to God you’ll get prideful…and He won’t allow you to use them as an excuse for avoiding your mission or ignoring your purpose. If God is calling you to a monumental task, He will equip you to complete it—and that includes the Holy Spirit working from inside you. So focus on His strength, not yours. Don’t think about how incapable you are for the task. Remember, God is bigger than anything you face, no matter how overwhelming it may appear.” The Bible says we were “created in Christ…to do good works, which God prepared in advance for us to do” (Eph 2:10 NIV). God’s plans are never an afterthought. He designed you for a specific purpose, and the One who “began a good work in you will carry it on to completion.” So instead of letting fear stop you, let it motivate you to get up and get going!

Source:  https://www.jentezenfranklin.org/posts/dont-let-fear-stop-you-1

Are You Ready for the Future? How to Avoid Technological Unemployment

“Where do you see yourself in 5-10 years?” This is a common job interview question, but it’s also one you should ask yourself. Even if you’re not currently interviewing for a new job. Why? Because in five to ten years (or less), you may be interviewing for a new job after having been replaced by artificial intelligence in your current job.

Think it can’t happen to you? The phenomenon of “technological unemployment” is happening at a much faster rate than in the previous century. Corey Koehler of SideHustleX discusses the ramifications of technological unemployment and how it will impact the future of work:

The Future Of Work: Something Called Technological Unemployment

The Future of Technological Unemployment

Unlike in the previous century, robots aren’t just stealing factory jobs. They’re stealing jobs at various levels in almost every industry, including the legal and medical fields. Eventually, robots will even replace doctors and lawyers! Can you imagine it? You better, because your job could be next.

What will you do then?

Will you panic? Or will you prepare?

Will you make yourself adaptable and marketable for the new human jobs that don’t yet exist? Will you know how to market yourself in a modern job market? And will you know how to create your own job and be your own boss if reality requires it?

There’s Good News

Now this all sounds like a lot of doom and gloom, but with every wave of robot-stealing-jobs comes another wave of newly created jobs for humans. The people most likely to be hired for the jobs that don’t yet exist will be the ones who are the most proactive in their career planning.

Therefore, career coaching is so important. It’s not just for the currently unemployed, but also for the employed (for now) folks. It’s why I’ve created paNASH’s new coaching track:  the Career Growth Track.

This track includes:

  • Successful on-boarding in your new job/role/business
  • Preparation for promotion and advancement opportunities
  • Transition planning
  • Establishing yourself as an industry expert
  • Staying relevant in your industry
  • Methods for asking for a pay raise or increasing your rates
  • “Fire”-proofing yourself
  • Maintaining joy and challenge in your career
  • Creating your own opportunities

How to Stay Relevant

Career coaching has always been important, but it looks different today. No longer is it just about helping you find a job or helping you progress in your career. It’s also about helping you be creative and be open to unexpected opportunities, including possibly working for yourself. It’s about helping you recognize where your various past experience is leading you next into an ever-changing world. And how to connect the dots from your past experience to new work that’s yet to be created. It’s the only way to stay relevant in the job market of the future.

To learn more about paNASH’s new Career Growth Track, email your questions to me at lorib@yourpassioninlife.com.

Sunday Inspiration: What You Must Overcome (Part 3)

Welcome to “Sunday Inspiration,” a bi-weekly devotional for those seeking spiritual encouragement in the pursuit of their passions. Each post comes from an outside resource (as referenced). I hope these posts will inspire and motivate you in your life and career in addition to our weekly original blog posts. Enjoy!

“Though it cost all you have, get understanding.” Pr 4:7 NIV

The third thing you must overcome on your way to success is ignorance. As writer Don Wood quipped, “Stupid is forever; ignorance can be fixed.” Far too often we don’t think realistically, or we fail to seek out the information and expertise we need. Edison failed many times, but his eventual success didn’t come from luck—it came from preparation. Many of us undervalue knowledge. For example, because computers allow us to try and to fail so many times, we don’t take time to read the manual. Because we’re so rushed, we’re reluctant to stop and find out what we really need to know. Because young people feel pressured into getting a job, often they fail to see the value of investing time in higher education. Golf champion Jack Nicklaus said, “Learn the fundamentals of the game and stick to them. Band-Aid remedies never last.” You may be fortunate enough to get promoted beyond your level of competence. But if your knowledge doesn’t keep up with your position, you’re doomed to fail. Here are some scriptural words to live by: “You’re blessed when you meet Lady Wisdom, when you make friends with Madam Insight. She’s worth far more than money in the bank; her friendship is better than a big salary. Her value exceeds all the trappings of wealth; nothing you could wish for holds a candle to her. With one hand she gives long life, with the other she confers recognition. Her manner is beautiful, her life wonderfully complete. She’s the very Tree of Life to those who embrace her. Hold her tight—and be blessed!” (Pr 3:13-18 TM).

Source:  https://www.jentezenfranklin.org/posts/things-you-must-overcome-3

Should You Share Your Passions on Your Resume?

I’ve critiqued resumes for nearly 20 years, and oftentimes I’ll see an “Interests” section on a resume. One of the most memorable “Interests” sections I saw included “eating peanut butter.” Yes, you read that right. Someone actually put on her resume she likes to eat peanut butter. And she wasn’t applying for a job as a taste-tester at Skippy!

Clients will ask me, “Should I have an ‘Interests’ section on my resume?” and there’s no right or wrong answer to this. Allow me to make this a little clearer.

When it’s wrong to share your passions on your resume:

  • When you don’t have enough room on your resume because of all the great accomplishments and results you have listed from your work experience. I’ve said it before and I’ll say it again:  accomplishments are KING on a resume. This is what your reader most wants to see, so give your audience what they want first.
  • When your life passions are totally unrelated to the job for which you’re applying. Again, know your audience!
  • When your life passions may initially be viewed as odd. While liking peanut butter it is not unusual, it could seem strange to include it on a resume. (All I could picture was her with peanut butter smeared all over her face – not a picture of professionalism!)

When it’s right to share your passions on your resume:

  • When you don’t have enough work experience to fill a full page.
  • When your life passions might be relevant to the job. For example, if you love golf and the job will require you to take clients on golf outings to network and close sales, then it’s appropriate. Or, if you’re passionate about playing basketball and the job requires you to work with youth in an after school program that promotes healthy living, then it’s appropriate.
  • When your life passions are relevant to your work passions and have prepared you for the skills needed in the job. For instance, if you like doing improv, that skill is often a basis for good sales skills. A love for blogging can be a plus for a job requiring strong writing and/or social media skills. A passion for coaching little league can translate into good leadership skills.
  • If you’ve completed a passion project that would be of interest to your reader and would showcase your skills.

Always be professional

Whatever you choose to include, always make sure you present it in a way that looks and sounds professional. Perhaps it makes sense to include it on a section other than an “Interests” section. Or, maybe you rename the section heading to “Work-Related Passions” (which sounds more dynamic and attention-grabbing than “Interests,” don’t you think?).

Also, help the reader connect the dots on how your passions will benefit the company. Remember, your resume isn’t about you. It’s about the company and what you can do for them! Let your passion for them shine through in your resume, your interview, and all of your communication and interactions with them.

For more tips on what to include and what not to include on your resume, subscribe to the paNASH newsletter. I’ll send out announcements for the on-demand Resumes That Get You the Interview program, due out later this month.

Maintaining Positivity in the Face of Job Loss or Job Rejection

I applied for A LOT of jobs when I was looking for my first “real job” right out of grad school in the late ’90s. About 75 to be exact. And I got about 70 rejections. Rejection is difficult enough. But multiple rejections makes it nearly impossible to keep a positive attitude. Especially when you’re young and you’ve never experienced job rejection before.

I knew I had to find a way to not let it get me down, or else I’d develop a negative attitude that would be evident in my interviews. Going into a job interview with a negative attitude was sure to guarantee further rejection. I had to break the cycle before it started.

I decided for each rejection, I’d tell myself I was one step closer to the job that’s right for me. It also helped to think to myself, “If they don’t want me, why would I want to work for them?”

The Result of Positivity

I finally did get a job offer. It was working in two of my three areas of interest within my industry. I was promoted a year later and got to work in my third (and favorite) area, career development.

Interestingly, I originally applied for a director position even though I knew I wasn’t experienced enough since I was just coming out of grad school. I decided to apply any way, just to see what would happen.

While I got rejected for the director position (for obvious reasons — lack of experience), they called me and said the assistant director position was also open and asked if I would be interested in interviewing for it. I was, I did, and I was hired. A year later I became a director.

This goes to show that sometimes you can apply for jobs you’re not fully qualified for because you never know what can happen!

The Power of Positivity

My mantras made a huge difference not only in my level of positivity, but also in my confidence. They worked so well, I’ve used them in other areas of my life and career. I repeat them when I don’t land I client I want to sign, or when a relationship doesn’t work out like I want it to.

I never knew at the time just how powerful this positive mindset would be throughout my career. I’ve always worked as a career adviser in various capacities. Often I have to encourage my clients who’ve been laid off from their jobs or who are experiencing rejection in their job search. I share with them the same mantras that helped me. Also I remind them that, while they’ve lost their job, they haven’t lost their ability to work.

One client in particular was feeling very angry about being laid off. But after sulking for a few days, she decided to change her view of her situation. She decided instead of calling herself “unemployed” she’d call herself “FUNemployed!” I loved this and encouraged her to embrace that attitude.

Allow Yourself Time to be “FUNemployed”

 
rejection
Photo courtesy of Unsplash

Periods of unemployment can provide you the time to get some much-needed rest, spend more time with your family, improve your health, be creative with your time, and explore your passions. Consider it a gift, and take advantage of it while you can. There will always be more work to do.

Are you at a place of career transition where you need some guidance? Have you lost your job and need help with the job search? Or do you need help exploring other viable options other than going back to work for someone else? Let’s talk! Click here to complete the paNASH intake form and schedule a complimentary “Path to Purpose” session. I look forward to hearing from you!

Related post:  What to Expect When You’re Expecting a Job Loss

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