Tag: strengths


Sunday Inspiration: Is Your Identity Tied Up in Your Work?

Contemporary Christian singer/songwriter Tauren Wells did a good job in a recent interview explaining the difference between identity, calling, and assignment.

He says:

  • Identity comes from God and God only. He’s the only one who can tell you what your identity is. No one else can (not even you with your negative self-talk!).
  • Calling is the skills God has equipped you with and called you to use; it’s the passions He’s given you and called you to pursue.
  • Assignment is a project (often temporary) that requires the use of your skills and passions. Assignments can be a job or your job title, a role (i.e. mother, family caregiver, manager, etc.), or a relationship. Again, these are often temporary.

Wells says it’s in the area of assignment where people confuse their identity. They think their assignment is their identity, but it’s not.

I see this happening with a lot of my clients. I also see people confusing their calling with their identity. They feel if they don’t find their purpose or discover their calling they can’t know who they are.

When I look back on my own career and the different roles in my life (i.e. friend, career coach, volunteer, etc.), I’m able to see how my skills and spiritual gifts have been used in every job and every role I’ve ever had. I know these gifts, skills, and passions have been given to me by God.

My skills have been more constant than my roles. But even those change over time as God gives me new skills, improves the ones I have, and gives me new passions and desires.

The only thing that has remained constant my whole life has been my identity (i.e. who God says I am), even when I wasn’t following Him.

And who does He say I am? He says I am His child. I am loved by Him even if I never possessed any of my skills or held any of my roles.

I am still valuable to Him even when my assignments and calling or skills have been stripped away from me.

It’s important to understand what your spiritual gifts and skills are so you can know how you can best contribute to the world, society, the church and God’s kingdom. But you must first understand whose you are before trying to understand who you are.

First I am a child of God. Second I’m an encourager (my top spiritual gift I’ve used in every job and role). And finally I just currently happen to be a career coach.

Who are you? More importantly, whose are you?

Are you confusing your identity with your calling or your assignment? If so, you’re probably feeling pressure God never intended you to feel.

It’s time to be free from that pressure, free from the tyranny of self and free from the doubts and opinions of others.

 

Source: https://wayfm.us1.list-manage.com/track/click?u=773901d1ea6a0b12a0ca6d2fb&id=d008f6af18&e=443a9b7717

Sunday Inspiration: What Are Your Strengths?

Welcome to “Sunday Inspiration,” a bi-weekly devotional for those seeking spiritual encouragement in the pursuit of their passions. Each post comes from an outside resource (as referenced). I hope these posts will inspire and motivate you in your life and career in addition to our weekly original blog posts. Enjoy!

“God has given each of us the ability to do certain things well.”   Ro 12:6 TLB

Paul writes: “Just as our bodies have many parts and each…has a special function…We are many parts of one body, and we all belong to each other…God has given us different gifts for doing certain things well” (vv. 4-6 NLT).

Dr. John Maxwell recommends that you work where you’re strongest 80 percent of the time, where you’re learning 15 percent of the time, and where you’re weakest 5 percent of the time.

So, what are your strengths?

To find the answer to that question, you must:

(1) Be secure. If you allow your insecurities to get the better of you, you’ll become inflexible and resistant to change. And if you don’t change you won’t grow.

(2) Get to know yourself. Spend time exploring your gifts, ask for feedback and receive it, and be honest about your blind spots.

(3) Trust your leader. If you can’t trust the person you’re following, you should look for someone you can trust, or get on another team.

(4) See the big picture. Your place on any team only makes sense in the context of the big picture. If your sole reason for finding your niche is personal gain, your wrong motives will rob you of the very joy, fulfillment, and success you desire.

(5) Rely on your experience. The only way to know you’ve discovered your niche is to try things, take risks, learn from your failures and successes, and discover what God has gifted you to do.

Source: https://www.jentezenfranklin.org/daily-devotions/what-are-your-strengths

4 Ways To Understand Your Uniqueness

A few weeks ago I gave a presentation to over 125 people on how to articulate their uniqueness through personal and professional branding. After all, everyone will always have to answer the question, “What makes you unique?” Sometimes the wording of that question will vary depending on the situation.

Lori Bumgarner, passion and career specialist

For instance, in a job interview it might be asked, “Why should we hire you?” For my former clients who were recording artists trying to secure a label deal, the label heads ask, “Why should we sign you?” For a budding entrepreneur, investors might ask, “Why should we invest in you?” In each case, what is really being asked is, “What makes you unique?” In other words, what is your personal brand?

Understanding Your Uniqueness

I work a lot with my clients on helping them determine the answer to that question (because they often find it’s not an easy one to answer), and then how to appropriately articulate it. While I have my own effective method of doing this, this morning I read a devotional entitled “Understand Your Child’s Uniqueness.” The ways it suggests to discern your children’s uniqueness are also ways we can use to understand our own uniqueness:

  1. What are your interests? Do you like numbers, colors, activities, etc.?
  2. What are your relationships like? Are you a leader, a follower, a team player, an independent spirit?
  3. What kind of environment do you thrive in? Do you prefer to stand out in a crowd or to blend in with a crowd? Do you do better at learning a subject as opposed to being tested on that subject?
  4. What are your strengths? (This is something I spend a lot of time on in helping my clients define and articulate their personal brand.)

A Good Example

This morning’s devotional stated, “Childhood tendencies often forecast adult abilities.” This is no big revelation. It makes perfect sense, and most of us already know this.

But I loved the example the writer of the devotional used to illustrate this point. As a boy, King David displayed two strengths:  fighting (against Goliath) and music. As a result, David grew up to be a victorious warrior in numerous battles against the enemy, and became a talented harpist and gifted songwriter, writing many of the Psalms. The example of David is a perfect one to show you don’t have to be and do just one thing.

I have a lot of clients who have spent years working in one area of their strengths or interests, but are ready to explore their other interests and develop new skills. They need help figuring out how to make this transition. This includes helping them articulate what makes them unique from others who are doing the same thing with the same abilities.

What Makes You Unique?

Do you know what sets you apart from others with similar interests and skills? If not, I’ll soon be sharing both in person and online my personal branding method designed to help you determine your uniqueness and how to articulate it.

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In-person workshops will be held through Nashville Community Education on Tuesday, May 31st at 7:00-8:00 pm and Tuesday, June 7th at 7:00-8:00 pm. Cost is $45 (price includes both class dates). Registration is required at http://bit.ly/communityedclass.

To ensure you receive updates on both the in-person and online workshops, subscribe to the paNASH newsletter. If you prefer one-on-one assistance in this area, take a moment to complete the paNASH intake form and schedule an appointment for an initial consultation. I’d love to hear from you!

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