Tag: resume advice


Is Your Resume Not Working?

Maybe it’s time to approach résumé writing from a different angle

If you’ve sent out hundreds of résumés and still aren’t getting interviews, maybe it’s time to re-think your resume.

Most job seekers approach résumé writing from the wrong perspective. They think their résumé is about them, when in actuality, it’s not.

To learn some fresh ways to write your résumé so you can grab the reader’s attention and land more interviews, check out the following out-of-the-box strategies. They’ll work well with the unique job search strategies I shared last week.

Stay tuned for more out-of-the-box strategies for networking and interviewing! 

Out-of-the-box résumé writing strategies

1. Show how you can meet the employer’s needs

Your résumé should be more about speaking to the employer’s needs than your own. A lot of people’s professional summary only lists what they want from the job. Instead, job seekers should talk more about what they have to offer the company.

Showing how you can help meet the employer’s needs will grab the reader’s attention. To find out how to do this, check out my post, “How to Write a Résumé: Make It About THEM, Not You.”

How to Write a Resume: Make it About THEM, Not You

2. Know what you need to delete from your résumé

You only have so much space to work with on a résumé. Therefore, it’s just as important to know what to take off your résumé as it is to know what to add to it.

For instance, if there’s something you’ve done in past jobs you know you never want to do again in future jobs, delete that particular duty from your résumé.

For 12 more items you should remove from your résumé, check out this free video, “What NOT to Share On Your Résumé“.

Resume Help

3. Don’t forget to include your side hustle

If you have a side hustle, either in addition to your current job or as your current means of income, include it on your résumé! Doing so will tell employers a lot about you.

For instance, it will show them how you possess many of the skills they’re looking for, like creativity, adaptability, and more.

Click here to learn how to best market your side hustle on your résumé.

Should You Share Your Side Hustle on Your Resume?

4. Protect your résumé from ageism

Unfortunately and sadly, ageism still exists in the workforce. If you’re running into road blocks with your résumé because of your age, click here for tips to keep you from giving away your age on your résumé.

These tips do not encourage you to lie about your age. Instead, they’re about helping you get your foot in the door for an interview, so you can show employers the benefits your skill level would bring them.

How to Gain a Little Protection From Ageism (Part 1)

5. Feel more confident about your résumé

As you apply the tips from the previous suggestions, you’ll feel more confident about your résumé and your skills.

But, there are probably some more things you still don’t know about how to write an attention-grabbing résumé. Click here to find out what they are so your résumé will stand out above the competition and land you more interviews!

Think You Know How to Write a Resume? Think Again!

Want someone to write your résumé for you?

Now, paNASH has a certified professional résumé writer on staff to write your résumé for you. Dr. Denisha Bonds can provide you a properly-worded and uniquely-designed résumé to help you succeed in your job search!

Click here to request a quote.

paNASH Adds New Career Coach and More Services

Stay tuned for next week when I share several out-of-the-box networking strategies!

Related resources

Look Out! Here Comes a Truth Bomb About Your Resume

Truth Bomb:  Your Resume is Not About You!

Shock is the reaction I usually get when I say what I’m about to say. Your resume is not about you. Thinking it is, is one of the biggest mistakes people make when writing their resume. Here’s what I mean:

A few weeks ago, I was working with two different people to help them polish up their resumes. One was a client seeking a pay raise and promotion. The other was one looking for a new job following a downsize. Resumes for both clients had the same common mistake: they were void of any results or accomplishments from their past jobs or positions. This is a HUGE mistake because that’s the one thing people reviewing resumes are looking for the most!

When I first suggested to each client we add in some results of their past work so their resume doesn’t read like a generic job ad, one said, “I was just there to do a good job, I wasn’t seeking any kind of glory.” While this is a noble approach to good work, job seekers have to understand that including accomplishments on their resume is not about them. The moment you say, “I don’t want/like to brag,” is the moment you’ve made it all about you.

Resume Truth:  It’s about them!

Including results of your past work on your resume and talking about those results in an interview or a performance review IS NOT ABOUT YOU! It’s about what you can do for the company’s bottom line, which is all the hiring manager really cares about (typically and mostly).

Your resume should always speak to your audience’s pain points by showing how you can solve their problem. The way you show this is including the results and accomplishments you’ve had when solving similar problems in your previous jobs.

The reader knows that past behavior is the best predictor of future behavior. They’ll want to learn more about you if you can show how you’ve excelled in the past in problem solving. But you have to speak their language. And you must connect the dots between your past experience and your audience’s current needs.

How to Make It All About Them

In order to do this, you must know something about your audience. This is why you must research the company you’re applying to. This is also why you can’t rely on one blanket resume for each job.

It’s important to really analyze the job ad to figure out what they need from the new person in that role. Start by looking at what are the top 3–5 skills listed in the requirements for the job. Can you think of a specific time when you’ve demonstrated each skill? What was the result? Can you quantify the result? How did it impact the company’s bottom line?

  • Did it increase profit or revenue? By how much?
  • Did it decrease spending? By what percentage?
  • Did it save man hours? How does that translate to dollars saved?
  • Did it increase customer satisfaction or decrease customer complaints? By what percentage?
  • Did it make processes more efficient? How much time did this save?
  • Did it boost staff morale? How much did productivity increase with this boost?

By showing the byproducts of your good work, the hiring manager can infer that you can and will produce similar results for them. Not sharing those results will leave the manager wondering if you’ll be a productive and valuable addition to the payroll. Don’t leave your audience in the dark!

The result of including results

Defining your results and being able to articulate them tactfully is one of the biggest challenges of a job search or promotion negotiation, but there is help. I work in depth with my clients on how to properly word their results and accomplishments for both their resumes and their responses to interview questions.

By doing this, my clients gain a better understanding of their skillset and greater confidence in their net worth, resulting in successful salary negotiations, higher salary offers, and better promotions.

Are you looking to get hired, earn more, or advance in your career? If so, now’s the time to learn how to do it with a little paNASH! Click here to get started.

Related Posts