Tag: career decisions


How to Be Patient When You’re In Between Jobs

Patience. They say it’s a virtue. Probably because it’s something rare. In today’s world, we don’t have to be as patient because we’ve grown accustomed to technology that provides instant results.

But patience is something I’ve been trying to learn for a very long time. I’m definitely seeing improvement, but I still have a long, long way to go.

Others have noticed and often commented on how patient I am in certain situations. What they don’t know is sometimes I’m just good at hiding my impatience (except when I’m on hold with the cable company). While my demeanor is calm, I’m still thinking in my head, “Hurry up! Hurry up! Hurry up!”

In other situations, I’ve just learned over time (often times the hard way) to exhibit true patience. This means staying peaceful when things don’t happen in my own time or I start to feel restless or worried.

5 ways to learn how to be patient during the job search

My clients often experience worry and restlessness when they’re between jobs and they’re not getting the results they’d like from their job search as soon as they’d like.

It’s easy to panic during this time when there’s no money coming in and the savings account is dwindling. Perhaps you’re currently in a similar situation.

So how do you be patient in the midst of such career and financial stress?

#1. Practice patience.

We all have an unlimited amount of opportunities to practice patience, whether it’s something small like sitting in traffic or waiting in the only open checkout line at the store. Or, whether it’s something big like trying to figure out your purpose in life or looking for a new job.

You can begin with the small things to start to practice patience. When you find yourself in those small annoying scenarios where you can choose to be patient or not, always choose patience. If you decide ahead of time you’re going to choose to be patient in these scenarios before they pop up, it will be easier to react patiently. If you mess up and become impatient, it’s okay. Trust me. You’ll soon find another opportunity to try again.

Once you start to become intentional in your patience, you’ll find it becomes easier, even for the big stuff like waiting to hear back from your last job interview.

#2 Be realistic in your expectations.

If something isn’t happening the way you wanted or in the time frame you hoped for, ask yourself if you have realistic or unrealistic expectations of the situation or the other party involved. And be honest with yourself.

The part of the job search where I see most of my clients having unrealistic expectations is in networking. They think they can just tell everyone they know they’re looking for a job and that should be it. This is not how networking works. So if this is your expectation, you’ll want to read my blog post “How to Be Realistic About Networking” and then readjust your expectations.

And when it comes to interviews, keep in mind companies are starting to take more time in making hiring decisions.

In addition, most companies tend to underestimate how long the hiring process will take. They may say they hope to have a decision by the week after your interview, but stuff happens and their work still has to get done during the hiring process. This sometimes pushes the process back a bit.

Just last week I had a client ask me how long she should wait to follow up with a company after her interview. She thought two to three days was reasonable. I told her it’s more like two to three weeks! Two to three days isn’t nearly enough time for a company to complete the other interviews, discuss among all the decision makers and check references, all while having to do their other work.

Always try to put yourself in the other person’s shoes to help you maintain realistic expectations.

And be open-minded enough to accept how things might happen in a different way or different time frame than you think they should.

#3. Do what’s in your control.

When I was coming out of grad school, I wasn’t too picky about geographic location for my first job. So, I applied all over the country to about 75 jobs. And I only got about a 10% positive response rate which is the norm. Therefore, there were a lot of negative responses.

How did I deal with those negative responses?

I told myself every rejection just meant I was one step closer to the right job for me.

This mantra helped me to be patient, stay focused on the things within my control and let go of the things not in my control.

The only thing I could control were my networking efforts, sending out resumes by the closing dates, and my emotions. I couldn’t control anyone else’s timeline and I couldn’t make them like me over a more qualified candidate. Trying to would’ve been a waste of my time.

#4 Don’t make important decisions when you’re emotional.

Speaking of emotions, it’s never good to make important decisions, especially career decisions, when you’re experiencing extreme emotion.

I once heard of something called the “SHALT” decision-making method. The premise of this method is to never make decisions when you’re sad, hungry, angry, lonely, or tired. I would also add to this list scared or afraid.

Fear is one of the biggest causes of bad career decisions. But taking a job out of fear of not making ends meet or because it seems to be the only offer available can often lead to going through the job search process all over again the following year (or sooner).

There are other ways to make ends meet and buy some time to avoid making a rash decision that could negatively affect the rest of your career. This can include cutting unnecessary expenses, selling or renting things you don’t use anymore, renting out your spare room, and working a side job or as a freelancer.

#5 Relish the time you have between jobs.

While you may be anxious to find your next opportunity, don’t forget to relish this extra time you have by spending it with your family, working out more and improving your health, and exploring your passions.

It’s also a great time to learn some new skills through online courses that will build your resume and make you more marketable.

Consider this time a gift to take advantage of while you can.

Be patient with yourself!

By following the above tips, you’ll find you have more patience than you thought you had. And, you’ll learn to replace the worry and frustration of impatience with the hope and peace of anticipation.

But it’s important to not beat yourself up if you fail at patience every once in a while. It will happen because you’re human. So remember to also be patient with yourself!

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How to Make Your Big Decisions More Simple

Excerpt From Lori’s Latest Personal Branding Book

Here’s an edited excerpt from my newest personal branding book. I’m excited to share in my third book how to make better life and career decisions. Enjoy!

Are you facing a big decision, unsure which direction to take or which option to choose?

It could be career-related, such as the choice between two job offers.

Or it could be more personal, like the choice between staying in a relationship or ending it.

If only there was a simple way to make these difficult decisions! Well, maybe there is.

Notice I said “simple,” not “easy.”


I’ve personally found a simple way to make some of my hardest decisions.

But, it requires deep reflection and discipline to utilize it.

I’ve used this same method in working with my clients to help them better face their own difficult decisions.

Here’s how it’s worked for me, and how it can work for you.


Reflection

First, I had to come up with my own personal mission statement.

I’d done a professional mission statement for my business, so why not a personal one just for me?

I had to spend time reflecting on my core values, philosophy, and goals.

Then I had to reflect on how I wanted to carry out those hopes and beliefs.

This took some time and required me to be completely honest with myself and with God.

My personal mission statement:

“To boldly pursue my passions and purpose, and to teach, encourage, and inspire others to do the same, resulting in lives overflowing with joy, peace, and fulfillment.”


Discipline

Second, I had to remember to use my mission statement as a filter for all my choices.

If the choice didn’t support my mission statement, it had to go.

I had to be disciplined enough to make the decision my mission statement revealed to be the right one.

No matter how difficult it would be.


For example, at the time I wrote my mission statement in late 2015, my friendship with my guy-friend was turning romantic.

The relationship was great at first, but after nine months of dating, I noticed a pattern that had been developing for some time.

This pattern wouldn’t make such a relationship sustainable if certain variables remained the same, which they did.

I wasn’t sure if I should end the relationship or give it another chance.

After much prayer, I was reminded of my mission statement and why I’d written it.

So, I pulled it out and started reading it. I immediately realized that the relationship didn’t support the life goals in my mission statement.


What I had to do.

Though I didn’t want to end the relationship, I had to in order to stay true and authentic to my God-given hopes.

It wasn’t an easy thing to do because my heart didn’t feel like ending it.

But my soul knew what was best for me in the long run. (This is why it’s dangerous to subscribe to the “just-follow-your-heart” advice of today’s culture.)

I had to be disciplined enough to push through my fickle emotions which were temporary, and focus on the decision that would make me happier and healthier down the road.

Once I ended it, I received confirmation in so many forms (including red flags that weren’t previously present) and realized I had indeed made the right decision.

Anytime I considered turning back, those red flags served as reminders as to why I had to stick to my decision.


What do you have to do?

Do you have a big decision in your life you soon have to make?

Maybe it involves a move to a new state or a new country.

Maybe it involves going back to school or ending a long-time friendship.

Whatever decision you face, I encourage you to follow a similar process to see if it helps make things a little simpler.

Not easier, just simpler.

It may even make you stronger.

Get the Personal Branding Book!

To learn how to write your own mission statement along with discovering what makes you unique and how to articulate your uniqueness, check out my latest book:

Personal Branding: Why You Need to Know What Makes You YOUnique and AWEthentic

Copies of my personal branding book are available in paperback for $12.99 or for free with purchase of my on-demand program. To receive more info, click below:

personal branding book