Tag: personal branding


paNASH is Celebrating Its 10-Year Anniversary!

Ten years ago today, I walked into the Davidson County Clerk’s office to get a business license for paNASH. I had no idea what I was doing since I’d never started a business before.

It was scary to say the least. But, I put one foot in front of the other, filled out the form, and paid my fee.

When I walked out I thought to myself, “Okay, this is real now. I have to do it.” My business license was more than just a little piece of paper. It was something tangible that was holding me accountable.

I started working hard on my business part-time while still working full-time. Nine months later I took a leap of faith and quit my cushy career advising job with benefits to pursue my business full-time.

paNASH’s Beginnings

paNASH originally began as an image consulting business working primarily with up-and-coming recording artists here in Nashville. I used my skills from my previous experience as a college career adviser to teach new artists how to present themselves in media interviews, to labels, and more. The additional wardrobe styling piece of the business served as a creative outlet for me at the time.

But after eight years, I started feeling restless in my business and it no longer felt right to me. I couldn’t yet put my finger on why, but I knew it was about to undergo some big changes.

I loved working for myself and knew I didn’t want that to change, but I was burned out on the original concept of the business. And, I’d become extremely frustrated with the way the music industry works. I loved my clients, but I was done with the constant frustrations.

I didn’t know it at the time, but I was being called back to what I loved most and was best at, career coaching. Only this time, it was taking on a new approach. For the full story, read From Fashionista to Passionista.

paNASH

paNASH Today

Since making the change to my business nearly two years ago, I’ve been much happier. It thrills me to see my clients gain the confidence to pursue their own passions that have been lying dormant for so many years.

Although they face a series of common challenges while going through the process of pursuing their passions, they start to sense an excitement in the transition to a new life and career. They have a light in their eyes again.

And while I’m also happier, I still face some challenges in my own transition of the focus and mission of my business. One of those is still being thought of as an image consultant. I guess I did a really good job of establishing paNASH’s brand early on. Too good of a job! When you Google paNASH, there are still some things that pop up indicating image consulting. I’ve had to turn away several people seeking image consulting services.

But, I’m using the same branding strategy now that I did then to eventually replace my former brand. And it’s working. Just like it works for my new clients whom I’m teaching how to develop their own personal brand for their career and their lives.

The Importance of a Mission Statement

I’ve said it before and I’ll say it again. It’s so important to have a brand and a mission statement for yourself. My personal mission statement is:

To boldly pursue my passions and purpose, and to teach, encourage, and inspire others to do the same, resulting in lives overflowing with joy, peace, and fulfillment.

This mission statement helps me to make better decisions regarding both my business and my personal life.

My business’s mission statement also aligns with my personal mission statement. When I changed the mission of paNASH nearly two years ago, it became:

To serve, educate, and encourage you by assisting you with the discovery and pursuit of your passions in a way that honors your purpose and your own vision for success, while amplifying who you are personally and advancing you professionally.

No matter what your goals are, I encourage you to also develop your own mission statement. To learn how, check out my on-demand program on personal branding (45% of proceeds go to Justice & Mercy International). You’ll be glad you did because once you’ve completed the program, you’ll be able to make better life and career decisions. Decisions that are true to your unique passions!

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A Simple Way to Make Big Decisions

Are you facing a big decision, unsure which direction to take or which option to choose? It could be career-related, such as the choice between two job offers. Or it could be more personal, like the choice between staying in a relationship or ending it. If only there was a simple way to make these difficult decisions! Well, maybe there is.

Notice I said “simple,” not “easy.” I’ve personally found a simple way to make some of my hardest decisions. But, it requires deep reflection and discipline to utilize it. I’ve used this same method in working with my clients to help them better face their own difficult decisions. Here’s how it ‘s worked for me, and how it can work for you.

Reflection

First, I had to come up with my own personal mission statement. I’d done a professional mission statement for my business, so why not a personal one just for me? I had to spend time reflecting on my core values, philosophy, and goals. Then I had to reflect on how I wanted to carry out those hopes and beliefs. This took some time and required me to be completely honest with myself and with God.

My personal mission statement:  To boldly pursue my passions and purpose, and to teach, encourage, and inspire others to do the same, resulting in lives overflowing with joy, peace, and fulfillment.

Discipline

Second, I had to remember to use my mission statement as a filter for all my choices. If the choice didn’t support my mission statement, it had to go. I had to be disciplined enough to make the decision my mission statement revealed to be the right one. No matter how difficult it would be.

For example, at the time I wrote my mission statement in late 2015, my friendship with my guy-friend was turning romantic. The relationship was great at first. But, after nine months of dating, I noticed a pattern that had been developing for some time. This pattern wouldn’t make such a relationship sustainable if certain variables remained the same, which they did.

I wasn’t sure if I should end the relationship or give it another chance. After much prayer, I was reminded of my mission statement and why I’d written it. So, I pulled it out and started reading it. I immediately realized that the relationship didn’t support the life goals in my mission statement.

What I had to do.

Though I didn’t want to end the relationship, I had to in order to stay true and authentic to my God-given hopes. It wasn’t an easy thing to do because my heart didn’t feel like ending it. But my soul knew what was best for me in the long run. (This is why it’s dangerous to subscribe to the “just-follow-your-heart” advice of today’s culture.)

I had to be disciplined enough to push through my fickle emotions which were temporary, and focus on the decision that would make me happier and healthier down the road. Once I ended it, I received confirmation in so many forms (including red flags that weren’t previously present) and realized I had indeed made the right decision. Anytime I considered turning back, those red flags served as reminders as to why I had to stick to my decision.

What do you have to do?

Do you have a big decision in your life you soon have to make? Maybe it involves a move to a new state or a new country. Maybe it involves going back to school or ending a long-time friendship. Whatever decision you face, I encourage you to follow a similar process to see if it helps make things a little simpler. Not easier, just simpler. It may even make you stronger.

To learn how to write a mission statement that’s authentic to your true self, check out my on-demand program Personal Branding:  How to Know What Makes You YOUnique and AWEthentic. In this program I teach you how to determine your unique differentiators and how to write your own vision and mission statements.

Note: 45% of the sales from this on-demand program go to support Justice & Mercy Amazon. Click here for more details.

4 Ways To Understand Your Uniqueness

A few weeks ago I gave a presentation to over 125 people on how to articulate their uniqueness through personal and professional branding. After all, everyone will always have to answer the question, “What makes you unique?” Sometimes the wording of that question will vary depending on the situation.

Lori Bumgarner, passion and career specialist

For instance, in a job interview it might be asked, “Why should we hire you?” For my former clients who were recording artists trying to secure a label deal, the label heads ask, “Why should we sign you?” For a budding entrepreneur, investors might ask, “Why should we invest in you?” In each case, what is really being asked is, “What makes you unique?” In other words, what is your personal brand?

Understanding Your Uniqueness

I work a lot with my clients on helping them determine the answer to that question (because they often find it’s not an easy one to answer), and then how to appropriately articulate it. While I have my own effective method of doing this, this morning I read a devotional entitled “Understand Your Child’s Uniqueness.” The ways it suggests to discern your children’s uniqueness are also ways we can use to understand our own uniqueness:

  1. What are your interests? Do you like numbers, colors, activities, etc.?
  2. What are your relationships like? Are you a leader, a follower, a team player, an independent spirit?
  3. What kind of environment do you thrive in? Do you prefer to stand out in a crowd or to blend in with a crowd? Do you do better at learning a subject as opposed to being tested on that subject?
  4. What are your strengths? (This is something I spend a lot of time on in helping my clients define and articulate their personal brand.)

A Good Example

This morning’s devotional stated, “Childhood tendencies often forecast adult abilities.” This is no big revelation. It makes perfect sense, and most of us already know this.

But I loved the example the writer of the devotional used to illustrate this point. As a boy, King David displayed two strengths:  fighting (against Goliath) and music. As a result, David grew up to be a victorious warrior in numerous battles against the enemy, and became a talented harpist and gifted songwriter, writing many of the Psalms. The example of David is a perfect one to show you don’t have to be and do just one thing.

I have a lot of clients who have spent years working in one area of their strengths or interests, but are ready to explore their other interests and develop new skills. They need help figuring out how to make this transition. This includes helping them articulate what makes them unique from others who are doing the same thing with the same abilities.

What Makes You Unique?

Do you know what sets you apart from others with similar interests and skills? If not, I’ll soon be sharing both in person and online my personal branding method designed to help you determine your uniqueness and how to articulate it.

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In-person workshops will be held through Nashville Community Education on Tuesday, May 31st at 7:00-8:00 pm and Tuesday, June 7th at 7:00-8:00 pm. Cost is $45 (price includes both class dates). Registration is required at http://bit.ly/communityedclass.

To ensure you receive updates on both the in-person and online workshops, subscribe to the paNASH newsletter. If you prefer one-on-one assistance in this area, take a moment to complete the paNASH intake form and schedule an appointment for an initial consultation. I’d love to hear from you!