Tag: job change


Get Unstuck! How to Know When It’s Time to Invest in a Career Coach

We all eventually find ourselves at a career crossroads at one time or another. We’re either sick of our jobs and itching for something new, or we find ourselves no longer needed in a job we love.

In those times we need some clarity and vision on the next steps of our career path.

In fact, you’ve probably heard that most people change their careers (not just their jobs) SEVEN times in their lifetime. For some of my clients, that number is even higher.

fork in the road

Navigating these career crossroads usually requires the advice and assistance of a career coach. How do you know when it’s time to invest in a career coach?

#1 When you need a job.

The most obvious time is when you’re in the throes of a job search and you’re looking for work related to your experience.

There are a lot of new, unwritten rules of the job search that only career coaching can show you how to maneuver. In fact, if you just rely on the information on the internet, you’re relying on information that’s about as old as the internet itself and is highly outdated.

A career coach can help you learn the new rules of the job search and provide personalized advice specific to your unique situation that no web site can provide.

#2 When you’ve been (or might be) laid off or fired.

“Never assume you’re not at risk of losing your job. Even if your company is growing and promises to be loyal to you. Business is business and things change. If your company doesn’t provide you any outplacement services or career coaching, you may want to invest some severance money into career coaching so you can find your next opportunity quicker and learn how to negotiate a higher salary. Learning such skills will pay for any coaching expenses, and then some.” (from “Want More Job Security? Do This One Simple Thing.”)

You may not need a job, until you lose yours. I’ve written several posts before on job loss.

When you’re forced to find a new job, what I shared in #1 applies in this situation as well. However, there are additional needs when a job loss is involved.

First, there’s a more emotional element that must be tended to – the grief some experience that comes with the loss of a job.

Then, in the case of a firing, there’s need for improvement in certain areas in order to “fire-proof” yourself in the future.

Finally, there’s figuring out what skills you need to update or add to your skillset to make you more marketable in the job market. This is especially true if you’re mid- to late-career and may face potential age discrimination.

#3 When you’re contemplating a career change to another role or industry.

You may find you’re bored with what you’ve been doing and want to explore something new and different.

Career coaching can help you determine what your transferable skills are and what other industries or job functions those skills easily transfer to. It can also teach you how to market those transferable skills so you can open the eyes of recruiters and hiring managers to your potential.

#4 When you want to grow in your career but feel stuck.

“Career coaching isn’t just for leaving your company. If you like where you work, coaching services can also help you advance in your company if that’s your goal.” (from “Want More Job Security? Do This One Simple Thing.”)

You love what you do but you want to see growth. Whether that’s in the form of more responsibility, more money, a bigger title, more purpose, etc.

But what if growth isn’t coming as quickly as you’d like and you feel stuck? Career coaching can provide you an actionable plan to help you grow at a more rapid pace than before.

#5 When you’re wanting to leave your current job to work for yourself.

You’re tired of working your butt off to make someone else rich. Or, you would just like to be able to set your own schedule and have more work-life balance.

Career coaching can help you determine if you have what it takes to go out on your own. It can help you determine if freelancing, consulting, or creating a start-up is the next best step or not.

It can also give you the confidence to do so in the face of the fears you’ll experience when stepping out on your own.

#6 When you’re reentering the job market after an extended leave of absence.

Reentering to the job market can also be just as scary. And, as I mentioned in #1, the rules of the job search may have changed since you last had to find something new.

Career coaching can help you not only explain, but also market your time away as an advantage to an employer.

Are You Facing a Career Crossroads? Is It Time For You to Invest In Some Career Coaching?

“It’s better to already have some career insurance in place if and when an issue arises, than to not have it and wish you did.” (from “Want More Job Security? Do This One Simple Thing.”)

Can you relate to any of the above scenarios? Each has their own unique challenges. Challenges you don’t have to face alone.

paNASH offers a variety of resources and career coaching services to choose from, including:

  • Free blog posts to provide you tips for a successful job search.
  • Affordable video resources available on-demand allowing you to work at your own pace to improve your resume, interviewing skills, and more.
  • Personalized coaching services designed to help you pursue your passions and find work that gives you purpose and opportunities for growth.

To find out more about how you can benefit from career coaching, sign up for a complimentary initial consultation.

Taking this first step could mean the difference between staying stuck in your current work situation or getting unstuck and pursuing your next exciting career endeavor.

8 Ways to Make Your Current Job More Bearable

Most of the places I’ve worked at in my career have been wonderful places of employment. However, there was one college I worked for that had low staff morale campus-wide. I was over career services for the students, but oftentimes staff would come to my office seeking job search help.

One of the perks of working for a college or university is your children get to attend tuition-free. The staff members coming to me were the ones who had stuck it out until their children finished school, and were now ready to move on. Because of the low staff morale, they lacked passion in their job. Some weren’t even sure anymore what they were passionate about. 

Are You Tied to Your Current Job?

This is something I also hear today from potential clients. People often contact me because they want to find their passion and get a job they can feel passionate about. However, they feel tied to their current job and don’t see a way out, at least not yet. Have you ever found yourself in this situation?

If you can’t leave your current job yet, there are ways to cope until you can develop an exit strategy. You may even be able to recapture your passion, or discover new passions by trying some of these simple suggestions.

How to Make Your Current Job More Bearable

  • Eat lunch away from your desk. No matter how busy you are, be protective of your personal time, even if you only get a half-hour lunch. If the weather’s nice outside, go eat at a picnic table or under a tree. If you can’t get outside, eat lunch by a window.
  • Have lunch with some of your favorite co-workers. Set a rule that you won’t discuss anything negative or anything related to work during those 30 to 60 minutes.
  • Get a little exercise. Spend part of your lunch or your break taking a quick walk around the building or do some stretching exercises. This will get your blood pumping and lighten your mood.
  • Volunteer to serve on a committee. Every company has various committees that need people from different departments to serve on. Find one that matches your interests and dedicate a reasonable amount of time to it (1 to 4 hours per month). Doing this will get you out of your daily routine and your everyday surroundings, introduce you to new people in other departments, give you purpose, and build your resume for when you’re ready to start sending it out.
  • Ask to represent your office at a conference. There may be money in the budget to send you to a local, regional, or even national conference. Not only will this provide you professional development, it will also expand your network and bring you a change of scenery from your current geographic location. If you can’t attend a several-day conference, see if you can attend a one-day drive-in conference or luncheon. A day away from the office while still being productive can help cure some of the doldrums.
  • Take a class. Your company may offer some continuing education opportunities you can take advantage of. If not, your local community will have numerous classes available to learn a new skill or hobby. This is especially important to make time for (1 to 2 hours per week for only a few weeks) if you’re no longer sure what your interests or passions are.
  • Update your resume. Make a list of all your accomplishments you’ve made in your current job and add them to your resume. Taking an inventory of this builds your confidence in your skills which in turn gives you the courage to start looking for something new. Just make sure you do this on your own time.
  • Stay focused on the things you like about your current job. Look for other opportunities that have those same positives.

Take the Next Step

I encourage you to come up with some of your own ideas. I also encourage you to not let yourself stay stuck. Recognize when it’s time to seek something new and start working toward it now. You want to be ready to move when the time opens up for you to do so!

If you need help coming up with a plan to make a smooth transition from your current job to your next job, start by completing the paNASH intake form!

You may also like:  “Feeling Trapped? 7 Ways to Cope”

The 12 Days of Purpose

Can you believe Christmas is only 12 days away? The holidays can keep you busy with gift buying, decorating, baking, and traveling (whew, I’m tired already!). They can also be a good time to discover what your purpose is in this current season of your life. Especially if you are contemplating a big change for 2017, including a job or career change or promotion, a start-up business, a retirement, etc. If so, here are some things you can do over the next several days (or any time of the year) to help you clarify, articulate, and present your purpose.

Clarify Your Purpose

Day 1:  Spend some time reflecting on what kind of person you want to be and to be known for (think in terms of traits instead of accomplishments). What do you want people to say about you at your funeral? And most importantly, why do you do the things you do? (Recommended reading: Start With Why by Simon Sinek.)

Day 2:  Take an inventory of your strengths, limitations, accomplishments, and how your skills benefit others. List the things you’re good at, the things you’re not good at, your biggest failures and the lessons you learned from them, and your reasons for why you like to do the things you do best.

Day 3:  Be open to constructive criticism. Ask your friends, family, co-workers, clients, etc. what they perceive to be your strengths and weaknesses. Note the things that show up as patterns and the things that surprise you.

Day 4:  Based on your own personal inventory and the feedback from friends, write down what you think makes you unique from other people who do what you do. See if you can think of additional things that make you unique.

Day 5:  Determine what makes your audience unique. Who are they (recruiters, potential clients, fans)? What do they care about? What’s their biggest challenge or need? How do your skills meet their need? How can you serve them with your abilities?

Articulate Your Purpose

Day 6:  Once you’ve determined why you do what you do (Day 1), write out your “WHY” in the form of a vision statement. A vision statement is your goal of what you want to accomplish with your skills and abilities. For example, the paNASH vision statement is, “I believe everyone should find the courage to discover and pursue their passions despite the obstacles they may face. I want to see people actively pursue their passions with flair (‘paNASH’) and confidence, along with responsibility to their purpose in life.”

Day 7:  Write your mission statement. Your mission statement is HOW you plan to carry out your vision/your WHY. For instance, the paNASH mission statement is:  “To serve, educate, and encourage others by assisting them with the discovery and pursuit of their passions in a way that honors their purpose and their own vision for success, while amplifying who they are personally and advancing them professionally.”

Day 8:  Craft your Unique Selling Point (USP). In 140 characters or less, create a statement that summarizes the unique impact you have on your audience. The paNASH USP is: “Putting your passion into action!”

Package & Present Your Purpose

Day 9:  Make sure you’re able to back up your message with a summary of your credentials and accomplishments. This can be in the form of a resume, a LinkedIn profile, client testimonials, reviews, letters of recommendation, etc.

Day 10:  Post your message on your social media platforms, your web site, your business card, and other professional collateral.

Day 11:  Foster and maintain relationships with strategic partners and your audience. Share your purpose and expertise in a variety of outlets, including blogs (your own and others’ where you can guest blog), article posts on LinkedIn and Medium, media interviews (print, online, radio, and TV), comments on others’ posts, etc.

Day 12:  Most of all, learn how to present your message and purpose with confidence and professionalism.

Do you need help with any of these steps? paNASH can help you clarify, articulate, and present your purpose and personal brand with professional etiquette and confidence. Click here to schedule a complimentary initial consultation.