Category: Inspirational/Motivational


Sunday Inspiration: 7 Steps to Success

Welcome to “Sunday Inspiration,” a bi-weekly devotional for those seeking spiritual encouragement in the pursuit of their passions. Each post comes from an outside resource (as referenced). I hope these posts will inspire and motivate you in your life and career in addition to our weekly original blog posts. Enjoy!

“He was…successful…because he obeyed the Lord.” 2Ch 31:21 CEV

Here are seven scriptural steps to success in life:

1. Put God first. He wants you to succeed; what good parent wouldn’t? So work on your relationship with Him. “Acquaint now thyself with him…thereby good shall come unto thee” (Job 22:21).

2. Help others to become successful. “Whatsoever good thing any man doeth, the same shall he receive of the Lord” (Eph 6:8). Don’t just be interested in yourself, become interested in others too.

3. Create a climate of confidence around you. As long as you keep speaking words of doubt, you’ll never experience victory. Remind yourself that your “sufficiency is of God” (2Co 3:5).

4. Stay informed. “A wise man will hear and increase in learning” (Pr 1:5 NAS). Observe, read, and grow. If you’re willing to pay money for a good meal but not for a good book, perhaps you value your appetite more than your intellect.

5. Visualize yourself attaining your goal. Think and talk in success pictures. Moses did that: “He had his eye on the One no eye can see, and kept right on going” (Heb 11:27 TM).

6. Write down your plan and establish deadlines. Make a detailed list of required activities, and set checkpoints. Guard your mind and prioritize your time. “Use your head. Make the most of every chance you get” (Eph 5:16 TM).

7. Set a realistic goal. And work toward it one priority at a time. Many things in life fail for one reason—broken focus. So avoid distractions: “A double minded man is unstable” (Jas 1:8). If you do these seven things, you’ll succeed in life.

Source:  https://www.jentezenfranklin.org/daily-devotions/seven-scriptural-steps-to-success

Sunday Inspiration: What’s Slowing You Down?

Welcome to “Sunday Inspiration,” a bi-weekly devotional for those seeking spiritual encouragement in the pursuit of their passions. Each post comes from an outside resource (as referenced). I hope these posts will inspire and motivate you in your life and career in addition to our weekly original blog posts. Enjoy!

“Let us strip off every weight that slows us down.” 
Heb 12:1 NLT

The Bible says, “Let us strip off every weight that slows us down, especially the sin that so easily trips us up. And let us run with endurance the race God has set before us.”

What’s slowing you down, or tripping you up? In life you only get to run once, so run to win. To avoid stumbling and losing your place in the race, don’t look back. You can’t change the past but you can learn from it.

Don’t be anxious about the next lap, just focus on the next step. If you miss that, you may fall and not get up again.

Keep going, and before you know it you’ll have more laps behind you than ahead of you. Make every one count.

Many of us carry the weight and worry of burdens. But older and wiser people have come to understand their burdens are of no real importance. We waste our strength extinguishing fires that if left alone would burn out on their own.

Time is your most valuable resource. Save it, and you’ve increased your assets and decreased your liabilities.

Travel light. Ditch the baggage of self-sabotaging habits and pointless fears. There are enough painful trials in life; why endure the ones you can “strip off”?

When blind Bartimaeus heard that Jesus was within reach, he threw off his coat so it wouldn’t trip him up, and ran toward Him. And his faith paid off: “Immediately he received his sight and followed Jesus” (Mk 10:52 NKJV).

You’ll never know how successful you can be until you get rid of the things that slow you down and trip you up.

Source:  https://jentezenfranklin.org/daily-devotions/whats-slowing-you-down

Sunday Inspiration: God Knows “the Text” of Your Life

Welcome to “Sunday Inspiration,” a bi-weekly devotional for those seeking spiritual encouragement in the pursuit of their passions. Each post comes from an outside resource (as referenced). I hope these posts will inspire and motivate you in your life and career in addition to our weekly original blog posts. Enjoy!

“God rewrote the text of my life when I opened the book of my heart to his eyes.” 2Sa 22:25 TM

You can be successful yet still feel empty inside. Solomon’s life proves that. He was the world’s wealthiest man, as well as one of the most famous. Yet amazingly he begins the book of Ecclesiastes with these words: “Everything is meaningless” (Ecc 1:2 NLT).

Solomon discovered that a fulfilling life can only be built on two things: relationships and purpose. And the first and foremost relationship you must establish is with God. Once that happens you discover your life’s purpose. And as you start walking in it your joy and fulfillment knows no bounds.

Self-help gurus tell us, “Look inside yourself and you’ll find the key!” But how can you uncover the plot for your life by simply examining your life? You’ll have more luck following “the yellow brick road”! No, “It’s in Christ that we find out who we are and what we are living for.

Long before we first heard of Christ and got our hopes up, He had His eye on us, had designs on us for glorious living, part of the overall purpose He is working out in everything and everyone” (Eph 1:11-12 TM). Your life’s purpose has already been determined by the greatest mind and the kindest heart in the universe: the mind and heart of God.

You say, “But things aren’t working out too well for me right now.” We all have times like that. But here’s a promise you can stand on: “He makes everything work out according to his plan” (v. 11 NLT). God knows “the text” of your life. Pray and He will reveal it to you.

Source:  https://jentezenfranklin.org/daily-devotions/god-knows-the-text-of-your-life

How to Handle Life Transitions Gracefully

“If you let it, life will take you on a grand journey beyond anything you could ever plan for. If you are receptive and open, you will be and do things far outside your current view of yourself.” Benjamin Hardy

In Benjamin Hardy’s recent article entitled How to Reach the Next Stage of Your Personal Evolution, he describes much of what my clients are currently experiencing in their lives and careers (and what I too have experienced in my own life and career). Here’s an excerpt:

How to Reach the Next Stage of Your Personal Evolution

“Every next level of your life will demand a different you.” — Leonardo DiCaprio

Life is a multiple act play. In each succeeding scene in the play of your life, you will act in different roles, have different supporting cast members, and take on new challenges.

Going from one scene to the next is a transition, involving loss and newness. Without question, change and transition are always difficult, if that change is real. It’s easy to become over-attached to a certain role you’ve played, perceiving that role as your identity. It’s painful realizing that various characters from previous scenes don’t make sense in the next scene, yet still you awkwardly try to fit them in.

If you let it, life will take you on a grand journey beyond anything you could ever plan for. If you are receptive and open, you will be and do things far outside your current view of yourself. To quote Biblo Baggins, “It’s a dangerous business, Frodo, going out your door. You step onto the road, and if you don’t keep your feet, there’s no knowing where you might be swept off to.”

The roles you will play

Lobsters are soft squishy creates that house themselves within hard shells with rigid and spiky insides. As a lobster grows, its shell becomes constraining, even suffocating and painful.

Once the lobster becomes too uncomfortable: it hides from predators under a rock, jettisons its old shell, and fashions a new one. This process repeats throughout the lobster’s life.

Each of the lobster’s shells may look drastically different from the previous one. Indeed, in its new shell, the lobster may be unrecognizable to its closest friends and even to itself.

Likewise, the various scenes in your life may demand you to be someone you never intended to be. Although you may have been timid and quiet in the previous scenes, your new situation may require you to lead and speak boldly.

Each situation is different.

In our individualized culture, we like to see ourselves devoid of a context, as though we are a self-contained entity. However, identity and meanings are housed within contexts. Take for instance the shirt you’re wearing. To you, it may be a shirt, to a baby it may be a blanket, and to a moth it may be lunch.

The relationship between things (the context) is the reality, not the things themselves.

In-between scenes (and shells)

Between each stage in your journey, you’ll go through minor — and sometimes major — identity crises. Although this isn’t necessarily enjoyable, it’s necessary and natural.

According to Identity Status Theory, before you commit to and achieve a particular identity, you’ll experience identity crisis. While experiencing identity crisis, you’re as the lobster whose outgrown its shell. You don’t quite know who you are, or what’s next.

Jeff Goins calls this phase “The In-Between,” — the tension between now and the next big thing. This in-between time is confusing and vexing. Like the naked lobster, you’ve outgrown and cast away your old shell, but haven’t found your new one yet. You feel exposed and vulnerable.

In each scene, you will feel like a child

At each new stage (or shell) in your journey, you will feel like a child. You’ll be required to learn and do new things. You’ll relearn past lessons but from new angles and with new meanings.

Continual growth demands you continuously become a child again. As a child, you will crave and seek understanding. Once you learn and adapt, you’ll likely become complacent. Thus, you’ll need to become a child again so your thirst to grow returns. In this way, you’ll never get stuck or stagnate. (Click here to read more.)

Learn to Relish Change in Life Transitions

In my work with my clients, I see these identity crises in clients of all ages. There’s no such thing as only one crisis that occurs only at mid-life. It occurs in my clients who are turning 30, 35, 40, 45, 50, 55, and so on.

One of the things I have to help them understand, as Hardy also explains, is to not only be patient in these times of uncertainty, but also to learn how to relish this time. These periods of life transitions can sometimes be the most exciting and exhilarating times of life because it’s when we finally open ourselves up to learning and trying new things. It’s when we feel most alive. Yes it can be uncomfortable, but it can also be fun if we allow it to.

If you’re currently going through a life or career transition, embrace it and let paNASH help you see the potential opportunities it can lead to. Click here to enjoy the rest of Hardy’s article.

Sunday Inspiration: Test The Waters (Part 2)

Welcome to “Sunday Inspiration,” a bi-weekly devotional for those seeking spiritual encouragement in the pursuit of their passions. Each post comes from an outside resource (as referenced). I hope these posts will inspire and motivate you in your life and career in addition to our weekly original blog posts. Enjoy!

“Make a careful exploration of who you are and the work you have been given.” Gal 6:4 TM

One pastor writes: “I could have taken a hundred gifts and ability tests as a young man and never discovered that I was gifted at teaching, because I’d never done it. It was only after I began accepting opportunities to speak that I saw the results, received confirmation from others, and realized God had gifted me to do this.”

Unless you’re willing to risk getting involved, you’ll never know what you’re good at. Sure you’ll make mistakes—and some of them may be so discouraging you’ll want to give up and not try again. But if you turn your mistakes into learning experiences you’ll not only discover what God has called you to do, you’ll grow and become proficient at it.

Paul writes: “Make a careful exploration of who you are and the work you have been given, and then sink yourself into that…Don’t compare yourself with others. Each of you must take responsibility for doing the creative best you can with your own life” (vv. 4-5 TM).

Then he adds: “Let’s not allow ourselves to get fatigued doing good. At the right time we will harvest a good crop if we don’t give up, or quit…therefore, every time we get the chance, let us work for the benefit of all” (vv. 9-10 TM).

Today take a serious look at what’s left of your life and decide to make it count. Some of the saddest words in life are on a tombstone that reads: “When I came to die, I discovered I had not yet lived.” Don’t let that be said of you!

Source:  https://jentezenfranklin.org/daily-devotions/test-the-waters-2